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5 Benefits of IT Staffing Services

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5 Benefits of IT Staffing Services

For the IT businesses and conglomerates to manage an industry that experiences exponential growth every year, they need top-tier people of the highest caliber. For this, we need an IT staffing company.

As of 2019, 4.1 million people were working in the Indian IT sector, and analysts estimate that 75% of the world’s digital expertise comes from India. Naturally, you’d imagine that a workforce with digital skills fueling a booming business is a marriage made in heaven.

You’d be correct, too. The bulk of India’s IT labor is local; hence, the Indian IT business rarely needs to search outside of the country for talent. It’s more difficult to hire from this breed in this sector, though. The consequences of a poor hire are all too well known to Indian businesses and employers.

There is no space for mistakes, given the IT sectors’ capacity to thrive in local and foreign markets despite slowdowns and their significant impact on the economy and the country’s GDP. To address their labor needs, businesses look to IT staffing providers in India.

  • You preserve the most important resource

Working with Indian IT staffing businesses might indeed help you save a ton of time. Without going above, the recruiting deadline, you may locate the ideal employee.

Consider the possibility that your own HR department may delegate the thorough and time-consuming process of screening and interviewing candidates to the IT staffing provider.

  • You have access to greater talent pools

The absence of a ready pool of applicants is one of the disadvantages of internal HR departments. They don’t have a plan and just search for talent when a need emerges. Although if they do have a talent pool, all of its members are either working or AWOL. The pool is neither filtered nor expanded with fresh talent.

You precisely optimize your entire spending. Without question, working with only an IT staffing company may help you save money in addition to saving time. Here are some ways Indian IT staffing services may help you save money.

  • An HR team on-site is not necessary

A staffing agency is capable of handling every aspect of HR-related tasks. Simply said, you don’t have to pay for the wages of HR staff members, the space they take up on the floor, their employee perks, retirement plans, etc.

As the staffing service you partner with can manage hiring tasks like applicant searches, interviews, and selection, you will start saving money right away. They handle even the paperwork, employee complaints, and terminations.

  • You adjust your resource allocation

The staffing company carefully selects the candidates it works with. They only choose applicants who meet the standards because they are aware of those of the IT business. As a result, your internal staff conducting induction training has it simple.

Several IT staffing businesses in India also offer the necessary training before the person begins to avoid wasting time and allow the project’s work to begin immediately. Your resources will be freed up so they may be used for other company operations that need urgent attention.

The knowledge and services offered by on-site HR departments are overshadowed by IT staffing companies’ services and degree of success.

Since this is IT, the practices of the internal human resources team, who are more knowledgeable about measuring employee satisfaction, employee grievances, workplace culture, and other topics, may not be able to provide the skill and expertise needed to understand the job position and the candidate persona truly.

From block to blue ticks: How China became big business for Twitter By Reuters

0
From block to blue ticks: How China became big business for Twitter By Reuters

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© Reuters. A Twitter logo is displayed on a mobile phone near a computer screen showing promoted tweets on China, in this illustration picture taken September 8, 2022. REUTERS/Florence Lo/Illustration/File Photo

By Fanny Potkin, Eduardo Baptista and Tony Munroe

SINGAPORE/BEIJING (Reuters) – Even as China bars 1.4 billion citizens from Twitter (NYSE:), its local authorities are splurging on global advertising on the site, helping make the country the platform’s fastest-growing overseas ad market and one of its largest non-U.S. revenue sources.

A Reuters review of publicly available government tenders, budget documents and promoted tweets from 2020 to 2022 shows local authorities and Chinese Communist Party propaganda offices for cities, provinces and even districts across the country have flocked to Twitter to buy ads.

The promotions, often outsourced by local governments to state media, pitched local attractions, as well as cultural and economic achievements, to an international audience, and were permitted under an exemption to Twitter’s ban on state-media advertising.

The review shows for the first time just how important China has become for Twitter, under pressure from investors to meet growth targets as its U.S. business stalls. It comes with the company embroiled in a legal battle with Tesla (NASDAQ:) Chief Executive Elon Musk, who is attempting to back out of his unsolicited $44 billion offer to buy Twitter.

Four sources told Reuters operations in China became a source of internal clashes between teams keen to maximise the sales opportunity and others concerned at the optics of doing business with state-affiliated entities at a time of growing tension between Beijing and Washington.

Twitter’s dealings in China may come to the fore on Tuesday when the U.S. Senate Judiciary committee holds a hearing to consider a whistleblower complaint filed by Twitter’s former security chief Peiter Zatko.

Among other claims, the 84-page complaint alleges “Twitter executives knew that accepting Chinese money risked endangering users in China,” and that “Mr Zatko was told that Twitter was too dependent upon the revenue stream at this point to do anything other than attempt to increase it.” Reuters could not independently verify the claims.

Twitter denies the accusations.  Zatko, through an attorney, declined to comment.

Two people with knowledge of the matter said Twitter’s China sales team actively courted local governments in the country as part of its global strategy to compete for ad business with tech rivals like Alphabet (NASDAQ:)’s Google and Meta’s Facebook (NASDAQ:).

Gaming, e-commerce, and tech firms in China are also key Twitter customers, according to two sources. Twitter’s sales of overseas ads to Chinese clients are estimated to be in the “hundreds of millions of dollars a year”, the people said, the majority coming from these companies.

The people with knowledge of the matter declined to be identified citing confidentiality agreements.

Twitter declined to comment on internal discussions and its sales performance in China. A spokesperson said the company has never hidden the fact that it does business with Chinese commercial entities.

‘INFORMATION IMBALANCE’

The company  banned political and state-media advertising in 2019, though an August blog announcement https://blog.twitter.com/en_us/topics/company/2019/advertising_policies_on_state_media that year allowed a carveout for ads “from (state-media) accounts solely dedicated to entertainment, sports and travel content”. In March this year, though, that exemption was rescinded, effectively banning state-media firms from advertising on Twitter altogether.

In a March Twitter blog post, the company’s vice-president of global public policy, Sinéad McSweeney, said that “a severe information imbalance” is created when governments that block access to Twitter within their state continue to use it for their own communications.

Still, Reuters found dozens of ads for Chinese local governments, as well as for state media themselves, published on Twitter since March. Twitter, like other platforms, also derives revenue when advertisers submit ads via a self-service online platform.

Twitter said it is improving auto-detection technology aimed at activities that violate the platform’s policies. “This work is challenging and we know we have more to do,” the company said in a statement.

The Chinese Communist Party’s top propaganda organ and the central government’s ministry of culture and tourism, both based in Beijing, did not respond to a request for comment. 

‘LIFE IS BRILLIANT’

Twitter’s China region has seen an 800-fold improvement in revenue since 2014, the fastest-growing globally, according to the now-deleted LinkedIn bio of Twitter Greater China Managing Director Alan Lan. The bio was reviewed by Reuters late in August before it was taken down.

Twitter declined to comment on the number in the bio nor make Lan, who leads the Singapore-based China sales team, available for comment.

Chinese local authorities continued buying foreign social media ads and content even after the COVID-19 pandemic triggered the closure of the country’s borders, according to a review of 36 publicly available local government tenders, budget documents from 2020-2022, and social media accounts. It wasn’t immediately clear why such ads were placed with China effectively closed.

“Life is always unusually brilliant because we are in Wuhan,” one promoted tweet from the @Visit_Wuhan account in July 2021 read, part of a 2 million yuan ($289,000) government tender.

Another promoted tweet from September 2022, a verified account for the province of Shaanxi, famous for its Terracotta Warriors, urged users to “Hurry up and follow me to Shaanxi to feel its charm!”  

AD POLICY TESTED

Some Washington-based senior Twitter executives, worried the expansion of its China business could backfire on the company, pushed for sales to Chinese government-affiliated accounts to be curbed altogether during the administration of former U.S. President Donald Trump as tensions with Beijing worsened in 2020, according to two sources.

Twitter declined to comment on internal discussions.

An attempt to set up what would have been the company’s first mainland China-based sales office was shut down in 2019 on data security concerns, sources said, as tensions swirled internally over the company’s operations in China.

Twitter didn’t respond to questions on the mainland office talks.

Reuters’ review of more than 300 accounts representing local governments found that as of the time of this story’s publication less than a dozen were labelled by Twitter as state-affiliated media. Publicly available tender documents reviewed by Reuters show the vast majority of these accounts are outsourced to state media.

Those included the verified accounts @PDChinaLife and @PDChinaSports, run by the Communist Party’s official People’s Daily, and which continued to advertise on Twitter until as recently as last month, as well as @iChongqing, a state-run operation paid by the southwestern metropolis of Chongqing. Both the People’s Daily and iChongqing did not respond to a request for comment.

BLUE TICKS

As the business grew, Chinese local government accounts ramped up their demands on the company, asking for blue-tick verifications just as accounts elsewhere do, or for help with negative activity targeting their accounts, two sources said.

“Some of the government accounts would earlier complain to their Twitter sales reps when there’s negative stuff or bots,” said one person familiar with China’s Twitter sales operations, adding that Twitter only acted on complaints about spam accounts commenting on or engaging with Chinese local government accounts. 

The buying of ads on Twitter by state-affiliated entities has come as Chinese police have increased arrests of citizens who have found ways to use the platform to criticise authorities, according to Chinese news coverage of court cases.

Chinese courts have sentenced dozens of people in the past three years for using Twitter and other foreign platforms to criticise authorities, according to court records and media articles.

China rarely comments on such cases, but when it does it justifies the punishment by accusing the critics of trying to subvert the regime.

($1 = 6.9222 renminbi)



#block #blue #ticks #China #big #business #Twitter #Reuters

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https://www.investing.com/news/stock-market-news/from-block-to-blue-ticks-how-china-became-big-business-for-twitter-2890703

Apple iOS 16 Now Available: Every New Feature You Should Know About

0
Apple iOS 16 Now Available: Every New Feature You Should Know About

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This story is part of Focal Point iPhone 2022, CNET’s collection of news, tips and advice around Apple’s most popular product.

Apple’s big fall iOS 16 software update is now available to download, bringing new software features, tweaks and upgrades to how your iPhone works. Apple’s new mobile operating system is available for compatible iPhones today. It’s compatible with 2017’s iPhone 8 and newer phones. The new iOS includes updates to Messages, a new customizable lock screen and a new CAPTCHA privacy update for more secure log ins. Big changes are coming to Wallet too, but lesser-known features lurking in iOS 16 are also worth checking out. Here’s every iOS 16 feature you should know about.

Plus, check out the newly announced Apple Watch Series 8, Apple Watch Ultra and iPhone 14.

The ability to edit and ‘unsend’ messages

“Embarrassing typos are a thing of the past,” Craig Federighi, Apple’s senior vice president of software engineering, said at WWDC as he introduced three of the most requested features for the Messages app.

First, in iOS 16 you’ll be able to edit sent messages. So if you notice a typo after a message, you’ll be able to edit the message after the fact. A tiny “edited” appears in the status under the message.

A screenshot of the iOS 16 Messages app showing one that's been edited

In Messages, you can edit previously sent messages.


Apple

Next, and this might be my favorite new feature, you can immediately recall a sent message. If you accidentally send an unfinished message, you can use the Undo Send tool to prevent it from being read and hopefully look less chaotic to your friends and family.

Last, you can mark messages and threads as unread. This could be an excellent tool for when you don’t have time to respond to a message in the moment, but want to make sure you come back to it later.


Now playing:
Watch this:

Testing iOS 16 (Edit/Delete Sent Messages, New Lock Screen…



16:22

A new customizable lock screen

One of the things you look at the most on your iPhone is the lock screen, especially if you have a Face ID-equipped iPhone. iOS 16 brings the most substantial update to the iPhone’s lock screen yet. Press and hold to edit your lock screen. You can swipe to try out several different styles. Each style changes the color filter for the background photo and the font on the lock screen so everything complements each other. This feels a bit like Apple’s take on Google’s Material You, which launched with Android 12.

You can also customize the fonts for the time and date, and add lock screen widgets like temperature, activity rings and a calendar. The widgets are akin to complications on the Apple Watch lock screen. 

Your iPhone will become more customizable in iOS 16. You’ll be able to choose how your lock screen looks, down to the font and color.


Apple

You can even set up multiple customized lock screens with different widgets and easily swipe to switch between them. There’s also a photo shuffle option that automatically changes the pictures on your lock screen.

One feature we’d been hoping to see Apple add was an always-on display. It’s something nearly all Android phones have; even the Apple Watch does. Well, with the new iPhone 14 Pro and iPhone 14 Pro Max, the always-on display has finally arrived.

A screenshot of the Live Activities tool on the bottom of the lock screen

iOS 16 adds a feature that developers can use called Live Activities. This is essentially a mini view of the real-time progress of a workout, sporting event or Uber ride from your iPhone’s lock screen.


Apple

Notifications and live activities

Sometimes notifications can cover up your lock screen’s photo, so iOS 16 moves notifications to the bottom of your display. As you receive them, instead of being compiled into a list, they appear like a vertical carousel. This not only looks better but should be a big help for one-handed use of your iPhone.

iOS 16 also aims to solve another notification problem. Sometimes you get a bunch of notifications in a row from one app, like the score of a basketball game. A new tool for developers called Live Activities makes it easier to stay on top of things happening in real time from your lock screen, instead of getting a series of interruptions.

Live Activities should make it easier to follow sporting events, workouts or even the progress of an Uber ride.

Skip CAPTCHAs using Private Access Tokens

The CAPTCHA — which stands for Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart — has been a necessary evil across the internet. CAPTCHAs are designed to make sure that a person is accessing a website or service, and not a bot. I find them annoying, as they often involve reading strangely written letters or having to find all the images that have a truck. With iOS 16, Apple plans to start replacing these awkward interactions with Private Access Tokens.

According to a video on Apple’s website demonstrating Private Access Tokens, websites that support the token will essentially log in and authenticate that you are indeed a human without your having to play any of the usual CAPTCHA games. Apple says in the video that the company is working with other companies to roll out support for this feature, so we can’t say the CAPTCHA will be dead after iOS 16 rolls out to the public. But the concept could provide some relief if it gets adopted.

Wallet and Apple Pay Later

ID cards from more states will be available in your Wallet app along with more security and privacy features. In iOS 16 you can also protect your identity and age. So rather than showing your exact birth date, the Wallet app will display your ID and that you’re over 21.

iOS 16 makes sharing keys easier with apps like Mail and Messages. When your friend receives the key, they can add it to the Wallet app on their iPhone. Apple said it’s working to make sure that shared keys are an industry standard and free for others.

A screenshot of cards in the Wallet app for iOS 16

The Wallet app in iOS 16 gets a bunch of small but notable updates, including the Apple Pay Later payment plan.


Apple

Apple Pay will support new types of payments and adds a new feature called Apple Pay Later, a Klarna-like service that lets you split the cost of an Apple Pay purchase into four equal payments spread over six weeks, with zero interest and no fees. Upcoming payments are managed through the Wallet app, making it easy to keep track of dates and payments.

But Apple Pay doesn’t stop there. A new feature will also help you track Apple Pay orders and lets merchants deliver detailed receipts and tracking information. This should make it easier to stay up to date on the status of all your orders.

A screenshot of a thread in Messages where a cutout of a dog is added

You can tap and hold on the subject of a photo and separate it from the background. Then you can drag it into another app like Messages to share it.


Apple

Visual Look Up’s tap and drag for photos

In iOS 15, Visual Look Up analyzes your photos and can identify objects like plants, landmarks and pets. iOS 16 takes this to the next level. When you touch a photo’s subject like the dog in the image above, you can lift it away from the background and add it to apps like Messages. Essentially it’s a tap-and-hold tool that removes a photo’s background.

Apple sometimes overuses the word “magic,” but this feature truly seems like it.

Craig Federighi introduces SharePlay in Messages in front of a giant screen

During the keynote for WWDC, Apple executive Craig Federighi introduces SharePlay for the Messages app.


Apple

SharePlay comes to Messages

SharePlay, which debuted in iOS 15, lets you have a shared experience while connecting with someone over FaceTime. You can watch TV shows, listen to music in sync and other things. iOS 16 adds the ability to discover more apps that support SharePlay from within FaceTime.

But perhaps one of the coolest things Apple did for SharePlay was to make it work within the Messages app. Apple said that this was one of the biggest requests from app developers. Now when you want to share a movie on Disney Plus, you can start SharePlay together with a friend while chatting in Messages.

An Apple executive presents the Safety Check feature during the WWDC keynote

Safety Check lets you quickly reset location sharing and access to passwords. It’s intended to be helpful for people in abusive relationships.


Apple

Safety Check aims to help people in abusive relationships

Safety Check is a new feature intended to be helpful for people in abusive relationships. It lets you review and reset who has access to location information as well as passwords, messages and other apps on an iPhone.

Focus mode updates and Focus filters

Focus mode gets several updates. The first applies Focus behaviors to widgets and lock screen looks. So you could have one lock screen set for when your Work Focus is enabled and another for workouts.

Apple added specific Focus filters that apply your iPhone’s Focus mode within apps. For example, in Safari, you can limit what tabs are shown depending on what Focus mode you have active.

Apple Maps adds transit fare cards

Maps will get several updates. You’ll be able to plan trips with up to 15 different stops along the way. If you start planning a trip with the Maps app on your Mac, you’ll be able to share that to your iPhone.

And in something similar to what Google announced for Google Wallet in Android 13, you’ll be able to see transit fare estimates as well as add more money to a fare card from within Apple Maps.

Craig Federighi shows off the new Quick Start feature during the WWDC keynote

In iOS 16 you’ll be able to customize Quick Start with a specific child’s iCloud parental controls and settings.


Apple

iCloud family checklist

iCloud gets several new features. One of the more interesting ones is the option to quickly set up a new device for your child. When Quick Start appears, you have the option to pick a user for the new device and use all the existing parental controls you’ve previously selected and configured. However, this is not what many of us still want: the ability to set up separate users for the same device.

There’s a new family checklist with tips for updating settings for your kids as they get older, like a reminder to check location-sharing settings or share your iCloud Plus subscriptions.

For more, check out everything Apple announced at its Sept. 7 “Far Out” event. Plus, here’s how to download iOS 16.

#Apple #iOS #Feature

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https://www.cnet.com/tech/mobile/apple-ios-16-now-available-every-new-feature-you-should-know-about/#ftag=CAD590a51e

Apple iOS 16 Now Available: Every New Feature You Should Know About

0
Apple iOS 16 Now Available: Every New Feature You Should Know About

[ad_1]

This story is part of Focal Point iPhone 2022, CNET’s collection of news, tips and advice around Apple’s most popular product.

Apple’s big fall iOS 16 software update is now available to download, bringing new software features, tweaks and upgrades to how your iPhone works. Apple’s new mobile operating system is available for compatible iPhones today. It’s compatible with 2017’s iPhone 8 and newer phones. The new iOS includes updates to Messages, a new customizable lock screen and a new CAPTCHA privacy update for more secure log ins. Big changes are coming to Wallet too, but lesser-known features lurking in iOS 16 are also worth checking out. Here’s every iOS 16 feature you should know about.

Plus, check out the newly announced Apple Watch Series 8, Apple Watch Ultra and iPhone 14.

The ability to edit and ‘unsend’ messages

“Embarrassing typos are a thing of the past,” Craig Federighi, Apple’s senior vice president of software engineering, said at WWDC as he introduced three of the most requested features for the Messages app.

First, in iOS 16 you’ll be able to edit sent messages. So if you notice a typo after a message, you’ll be able to edit the message after the fact. A tiny “edited” appears in the status under the message.

A screenshot of the iOS 16 Messages app showing one that's been edited

In Messages, you can edit previously sent messages.


Apple

Next, and this might be my favorite new feature, you can immediately recall a sent message. If you accidentally send an unfinished message, you can use the Undo Send tool to prevent it from being read and hopefully look less chaotic to your friends and family.

Last, you can mark messages and threads as unread. This could be an excellent tool for when you don’t have time to respond to a message in the moment, but want to make sure you come back to it later.


Now playing:
Watch this:

Testing iOS 16 (Edit/Delete Sent Messages, New Lock Screen…



16:22

A new customizable lock screen

One of the things you look at the most on your iPhone is the lock screen, especially if you have a Face ID-equipped iPhone. iOS 16 brings the most substantial update to the iPhone’s lock screen yet. Press and hold to edit your lock screen. You can swipe to try out several different styles. Each style changes the color filter for the background photo and the font on the lock screen so everything complements each other. This feels a bit like Apple’s take on Google’s Material You, which launched with Android 12.

You can also customize the fonts for the time and date, and add lock screen widgets like temperature, activity rings and a calendar. The widgets are akin to complications on the Apple Watch lock screen. 

Your iPhone will become more customizable in iOS 16. You’ll be able to choose how your lock screen looks, down to the font and color.


Apple

You can even set up multiple customized lock screens with different widgets and easily swipe to switch between them. There’s also a photo shuffle option that automatically changes the pictures on your lock screen.

One feature we’d been hoping to see Apple add was an always-on display. It’s something nearly all Android phones have; even the Apple Watch does. Well, with the new iPhone 14 Pro and iPhone 14 Pro Max, the always-on display has finally arrived.

A screenshot of the Live Activities tool on the bottom of the lock screen

iOS 16 adds a feature that developers can use called Live Activities. This is essentially a mini view of the real-time progress of a workout, sporting event or Uber ride from your iPhone’s lock screen.


Apple

Notifications and live activities

Sometimes notifications can cover up your lock screen’s photo, so iOS 16 moves notifications to the bottom of your display. As you receive them, instead of being compiled into a list, they appear like a vertical carousel. This not only looks better but should be a big help for one-handed use of your iPhone.

iOS 16 also aims to solve another notification problem. Sometimes you get a bunch of notifications in a row from one app, like the score of a basketball game. A new tool for developers called Live Activities makes it easier to stay on top of things happening in real time from your lock screen, instead of getting a series of interruptions.

Live Activities should make it easier to follow sporting events, workouts or even the progress of an Uber ride.

Skip CAPTCHAs using Private Access Tokens

The CAPTCHA — which stands for Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart — has been a necessary evil across the internet. CAPTCHAs are designed to make sure that a person is accessing a website or service, and not a bot. I find them annoying, as they often involve reading strangely written letters or having to find all the images that have a truck. With iOS 16, Apple plans to start replacing these awkward interactions with Private Access Tokens.

According to a video on Apple’s website demonstrating Private Access Tokens, websites that support the token will essentially log in and authenticate that you are indeed a human without your having to play any of the usual CAPTCHA games. Apple says in the video that the company is working with other companies to roll out support for this feature, so we can’t say the CAPTCHA will be dead after iOS 16 rolls out to the public. But the concept could provide some relief if it gets adopted.

Wallet and Apple Pay Later

ID cards from more states will be available in your Wallet app along with more security and privacy features. In iOS 16 you can also protect your identity and age. So rather than showing your exact birth date, the Wallet app will display your ID and that you’re over 21.

iOS 16 makes sharing keys easier with apps like Mail and Messages. When your friend receives the key, they can add it to the Wallet app on their iPhone. Apple said it’s working to make sure that shared keys are an industry standard and free for others.

A screenshot of cards in the Wallet app for iOS 16

The Wallet app in iOS 16 gets a bunch of small but notable updates, including the Apple Pay Later payment plan.


Apple

Apple Pay will support new types of payments and adds a new feature called Apple Pay Later, a Klarna-like service that lets you split the cost of an Apple Pay purchase into four equal payments spread over six weeks, with zero interest and no fees. Upcoming payments are managed through the Wallet app, making it easy to keep track of dates and payments.

But Apple Pay doesn’t stop there. A new feature will also help you track Apple Pay orders and lets merchants deliver detailed receipts and tracking information. This should make it easier to stay up to date on the status of all your orders.

A screenshot of a thread in Messages where a cutout of a dog is added

You can tap and hold on the subject of a photo and separate it from the background. Then you can drag it into another app like Messages to share it.


Apple

Visual Look Up’s tap and drag for photos

In iOS 15, Visual Look Up analyzes your photos and can identify objects like plants, landmarks and pets. iOS 16 takes this to the next level. When you touch a photo’s subject like the dog in the image above, you can lift it away from the background and add it to apps like Messages. Essentially it’s a tap-and-hold tool that removes a photo’s background.

Apple sometimes overuses the word “magic,” but this feature truly seems like it.

Craig Federighi introduces SharePlay in Messages in front of a giant screen

During the keynote for WWDC, Apple executive Craig Federighi introduces SharePlay for the Messages app.


Apple

SharePlay comes to Messages

SharePlay, which debuted in iOS 15, lets you have a shared experience while connecting with someone over FaceTime. You can watch TV shows, listen to music in sync and other things. iOS 16 adds the ability to discover more apps that support SharePlay from within FaceTime.

But perhaps one of the coolest things Apple did for SharePlay was to make it work within the Messages app. Apple said that this was one of the biggest requests from app developers. Now when you want to share a movie on Disney Plus, you can start SharePlay together with a friend while chatting in Messages.

An Apple executive presents the Safety Check feature during the WWDC keynote

Safety Check lets you quickly reset location sharing and access to passwords. It’s intended to be helpful for people in abusive relationships.


Apple

Safety Check aims to help people in abusive relationships

Safety Check is a new feature intended to be helpful for people in abusive relationships. It lets you review and reset who has access to location information as well as passwords, messages and other apps on an iPhone.

Focus mode updates and Focus filters

Focus mode gets several updates. The first applies Focus behaviors to widgets and lock screen looks. So you could have one lock screen set for when your Work Focus is enabled and another for workouts.

Apple added specific Focus filters that apply your iPhone’s Focus mode within apps. For example, in Safari, you can limit what tabs are shown depending on what Focus mode you have active.

Apple Maps adds transit fare cards

Maps will get several updates. You’ll be able to plan trips with up to 15 different stops along the way. If you start planning a trip with the Maps app on your Mac, you’ll be able to share that to your iPhone.

And in something similar to what Google announced for Google Wallet in Android 13, you’ll be able to see transit fare estimates as well as add more money to a fare card from within Apple Maps.

Craig Federighi shows off the new Quick Start feature during the WWDC keynote

In iOS 16 you’ll be able to customize Quick Start with a specific child’s iCloud parental controls and settings.


Apple

iCloud family checklist

iCloud gets several new features. One of the more interesting ones is the option to quickly set up a new device for your child. When Quick Start appears, you have the option to pick a user for the new device and use all the existing parental controls you’ve previously selected and configured. However, this is not what many of us still want: the ability to set up separate users for the same device.

There’s a new family checklist with tips for updating settings for your kids as they get older, like a reminder to check location-sharing settings or share your iCloud Plus subscriptions.

For more, check out everything Apple announced at its Sept. 7 “Far Out” event. Plus, here’s how to download iOS 16.

#Apple #iOS #Feature

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https://www.cnet.com/tech/mobile/apples-ios-16-is-available-now-new-lock-screen-editable-messages-every-other-change/#ftag=CAD590a51e

King Charles Inherits Untold Riches, and Passes Off His Own Empire

0
King Charles Inherits Untold Riches, and Passes Off His Own Empire

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LONDON — King Charles III built his own empire long before he inherited his mother’s.

Charles, who formally acceded to the British throne on Saturday, spent half a century turning his royal estate into a billion-dollar portfolio and one of the most lucrative moneymakers in the royal family business.

While his mother, Queen Elizabeth II, largely delegated responsibility for her portfolio, Charles was far more deeply involved in developing the private estate known as the Duchy of Cornwall. Over the past decade, he has assembled a large team of professional managers who increased his portfolio’s value and profits by about 50 percent.

Today, the Duchy of Cornwall owns the landmark cricket ground known as The Oval, lush farmland in the south of England, seaside vacation rentals, office space in London and a suburban supermarket depot. (A duchy is a territory traditionally governed by a duke or duchess.) The 130,000-acre real estate portfolio is nearly the size of Chicago and generates millions of dollars a year in rental income.

The conglomerate’s holdings are valued at roughly $1.4 billion, compared with around $949 million in the late queen’s private portfolio. These two estates represent a small fraction of the royal family’s estimated $28 billion fortune. On top of that, the family has personal wealth that remains a closely guarded secret.

As king, Charles will take over his mother’s portfolio and inherit a share of this untold personal fortune. While British citizens normally pay around 40 percent inheritance tax, King Charles gets this tax free. And he will pass control of his duchy to his elder son, William, to develop further without having to pay corporate taxes.

The growth in the royal family’s coffers and King Charles’s personal wealth over the past decade came at a time when Britain faced deep austerity budget cuts. Poverty levels soared, and the use of food banks almost doubled. His lifestyle of palaces and polo has long fueled accusations that he is out of touch with ordinary people. And he has at time been the unwitting symbol of that disconnect — such as when his limo was mobbed by students protesting rising tuition in 2010 or when he perched atop a golden throne in his royal finery this year to pledge help for struggling families.

Today, he ascends to the throne as the country buckles under a cost-of-living crisis that is expected to see poverty get even worse. A more divisive figure than his mother, King Charles is likely to give fresh energy to those questioning the relevance of a royal family at a time of public hardship.

Laura Clancy, the author of “Running the Family Firm: How the Monarchy Manages Its Image and Our Money,” said King Charles transformed the once-sleepy royal accounts.

“The duchy has been steadily commercializing over the past few decades,” Ms. Clancy said. “It is run like a commercial business with a C.E.O. and over 150 staff.” What used to be thought of as simply a “landed gentry pile of land” now operates like a corporation, she said.

The Duchy of Cornwall was established in the 14th century as a way to generate income for the heir to the throne and has essentially funded Charles’s private and official expenses. One example of its financial might: The $28 million profit he made from it last year dwarfed his official salary as prince, just over $1.1 million.

Piecing together the royal family’s assets is complicated, but the fortune falls generally into four groups.

First, and most prominent, is the Crown Estate, which oversees the assets of the monarchy through a board of directors. Charles, as king, will serve as its chairman, but he does not have final say over how the business is managed.

The estate, which official accounts value at more than $19 billion, includes shopping malls, busy streets in London’s West End and a growing number of wind farms The royals are entitled to take only rental income from their official estates and may not profit from any sales, as they do not personally own the assets.

The estate’s profits, valued about $363 million this year, are turned over to the Treasury, which in return gives the royal household a payment called a sovereign grant based on those profits — which must be topped up by the government if it is lower than the previous year. In 2017, the government increased the family’s payment to 25 percent of the profits to cover the costs of renovating Buckingham Palace.

The latest sovereign grant received by the royals was around $100 million, which the family, including Charles, has used for official royal duties, like visits, payroll and housekeeping. It does not cover the royals’ security costs, which is also paid by the government, but the cost is kept secret.

The next major pot of money is the Duchy of Lancaster. This $949 million portfolio is owned by whomever sits on the throne.

But the value of that trust is dwarfed by the Duchy of Cornwall, the third significant home of royal money, which Charles has long presided over as prince. Generating tens of millions of dollars a year, the duchy has funded his private and official spending, and has bankrolled William, the heir to the throne, and Kate, William’s wife.

It has done so without paying corporation taxes like most businesses in Britain are obliged to, and without publishing details about where the estate invests its money.

“When Charles took over at age 21, the duchy was not in a good financial state,” Marlene Koenig, a royal expert and writer, said, citing poor management and a lack of diversification. Charles took a more active role in the portfolio in the 1980s and began hiring experienced managers.

“It was at this time that the duchy became financially aggressive,” she said.

In 2017, leaked financial documents known as the Paradise Papers revealed that Charles’s duchy estate had invested millions in offshore companies, including a Bermuda-registered business run by one of his best friends.

The final pool of money, and the most secretive, is the family’s private fortune. According to the Rich List, the annual catalog of British wealth published in The Sunday Times, the queen had a net worth of about $430 million. That includes her personal assets, such as Balmoral Castle and Sandringham Estate, which she inherited from her father. Much of her personal wealth has been kept private.

King Charles has also made financial headlines unrelated to his wealth but tied to the charitable foundation that he chairs and operates in his name. His stewardship of the foundation has been marred by controversy, most recently this spring, when The Sunday Times reported that Charles had accepted 3 million euros in cash — including money stuffed in shopping bags and a suitcase — from a former Qatari prime minister, Sheikh Hamad bin Jassim bin Jaber al-Thani.

The money was for his foundation, which finances philanthropic causes around the world. Charles does not benefit financially from such contributions.

“He’s willing to take money from anybody, really, without questioning whether it’s the wise thing to do,” said Norman Baker, a former government minister and author of the book “ … And What Do You Do? What the Royal Family Don’t Want You to Know.”

Mr. Baker described Charles as the most progressive, caring member of the royal family. But he said he had also filed a police complaint accusing him of improperly selling honorary titles.

“That’s no way to behave for a royal,” he said, referring to an ongoing scandal over whether Charles had granted knighthood and citizenship to a Saudi businessman in exchange for donations to one of Charles’s charitable ventures.

Charles denied knowing about this, one of his top aides who was implicated stepped down, and the authorities began investigating. The king’s representatives did not respond to a message seeking comment.

Charles has also courted controversy with his outspoken views and campaigning. He has lobbied senior government ministers, including Tony Blair, through dozens of letters on issues from the Iraq war to alternative therapies. Though English law does not require it, royal protocol calls for political neutrality.

In his inaugural address on Saturday, the king indicated that he planned to step back from his outside endeavors. “It will no longer be possible for me to give so much of my time and energies to the charities and issues for which I care so deeply,” he said.

Ms. Clancy, the author, said the new king, in theory, would be expected to drop his lobbying and business ventures entirely.

“Whether that will pan out is a different question,” she said.

Sarah Hurtes contributed reporting from Brussels.

#King #Charles #Inherits #Untold #Riches #Passes #Empire

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2022 Emmys: TV’s hottest stars take to the red carpet

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2022 Emmys: TV’s hottest stars take to the red carpet

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74th Primetime Emmys - Arrivals

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Some of Hollywood’s biggest stars walked the red carpet of the 74th Primetime Emmys at Microsoft Theater on Monday, Sept. 12, in Los Angeles. This year’s show includes an especially exciting batch of nominees.  

Glamorous sequined looks appeared to be trending this year, along with daring pieces that turned heads. Here are some of the hottest looks worn by the stars at this year’s show.

In this photo, Hannah Waddingham arrives at the 74th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards. The British actress, who won Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series for her role in “Ted Lasso,” stole the show in a statement-making pink dress. 

Lizzo

74th Primetime Emmys - Press Room

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The best shots of singer Lizzo’s stunning red gown came after she won the award for outstanding competition program.

She had a high-fashion moment at the 2022 Emmys as she turned heads in a dramatic red-ruffle dress that included a long train. The “About Damn Time” singer was nominated for six Emmys.

Reese Witherspoon

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Actress Reese Witherspoon arrives for the 74th Emmy Awards at the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles, California, on September 12, 2022.

She dazzled in a sequin midnight blue dress and extravagant jewels at the 2022 Emmys. 

Zendaya

US-ENTERTAINMENT-TELEVISION-EMMYS-ARRIVALS

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Actress Zendaya’s look at the 74th Emmy Awards was nothing short of classic Hollywood glamour. 

The “Euphoria” star stunned in a black Valentino strapless gown that was paired with a satin headband and silver shiny choker. 

Sydney Sweeney

74th Primetime Emmys - Red Carpet

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It is fair to say actress Sydney Sweeney resembled a princess at the 2022 Emmys.  

Her pearly white Oscar de la Renta gown featuring silver floral embroidery included an attached train. 

Kerry Washington Black

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Kerry Washington Black attends the 74th Primetime Emmys in a stylish look that set the “Scandal” actress apart from others walking the red carpet.

Elle Fanning

74th Primetime Emmys - Arrivals

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Elle Fanning laughs as she poses for a photo on the red carpet of the 74th Primetime Emmys. 

She is nominated in the category of Outstanding Lead Actress In A Comedy Series for her role as Catherine The Great in “The Great.” 

Laverne Cox

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Actress Laverne Cox looked stunning on the red carpet of the 74th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards. 

Her unique ensemble featured a cone bra corset. 

Lily James

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Actress Lily James sports a jaw-dropping look at the 74th Primetime Emmys. 

James is nominated in the category of Outstanding Lead Actress In A Limited Or Anthology Series Or Movie for her role as Pamela Anderson in “Pam and Tommy.” 

Markella Kavenagh

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Markella Kavenagh attends the 74th Primetime Emmys. 

The Australian actress dressed in a red tube top A-line gown that featured a black lace pattern at the top. 

Natasha Rothwell

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Natasha Rothwell attends the 74th Primetime Emmys. 

The comedian and actress made a statement as she embraced a bold puffy sleeved long gown with pockets. 

John Legend

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Singer John Legend attends the 74th Primetime Emmys in a white suit. 

The star is wearing Gucci. 

Chrissy Teigen

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Chrissy Teigen attends the 74th Primetime Emmys. 

The model and television personality dressed in a colorfully fun long-sleeve sequined gown. 

Britt Lower

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Britt Lower turned heads on the red carpet of the 74th Primetime Emmys with a long A-line sequined dress. 

The “Severance” and “Man Seeking Woman” actress paired the look with long matching sequined gloves. 

Amy Poehler

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Amy Poehler attends the 74th Primetime Emmys. 

The “Saturday Night Live” alum is all smiles here as she poses on the red carpet. 

Rachel Lindsay

74th Primetime Emmys - Arrivals

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Rachel Lindsay arrives to the 74th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards. 

The “Bachelor” alum’s dress featured spaghetti straps and a thigh-high slit. 

Jeff Waite and Liz Phang

74th Primetime Emmys - Arrivals

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Jeff Waite and Liz Phang arrive to the 74th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards. 

Phang looked sophisticated in an elegant long A-line silver sequined gown, while Waite stuck with a formal black tie look. 

Samantha Hanratty

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Samantha Hanratty attends the 74th Primetime Emmys. 

The belt on the “An American Girl: Chrissa Stands Strong” star’s gown showed off her nipped waist. 

Dichen Lachman

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Australian actress and producer Dichen Lachman is seen with a shiny look on the red carpet of the 74th Primetime Emmys. 

She dazzled with a short dress that included white, pink and silver patterns across it. 

Sheryl Lee Ralph and Vincent J. Hughes

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Sheryl Lee Ralph and Vincent J. Hughes were a perfectly matching pair as they walked the red carpet of the 74th Primetime Emmys.

Ralph’s sleek tube top dress complemented Hughes’ black tie tuxedo.   

Emily Heller

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Emily Heller didn’t follow fashion norms at this year’s Emmys. 

The comedian and actress paired her short and simple floral dress with a signed that read “kick me” in the back. 

Megan Stalter

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Megan Stalter attends the 74th Primetime Emmys. 

The comedian was revealing in a lace flower patterned see-through gown. 

Mandy Safavi

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Mandy Safavi attends the 74th Primetime Emmys. 

The co-executive producer of “Dopesick” is nominated in the category of Outstanding Limited Or Anthology Series. 

Cast of the ‘Brady Bunch’

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From left to right, Barry Williams, Mike Lookinland, Susan Olsen, Christopher Knight, and Eve Plumb attend the 74th Primetime Emmys. 

The five are seen smiling together as they walk the red carpet. 

Geena Davis

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Oscar winner Geena Davis attends the 74th Primetime Emmys. 

The Golden Globe recipient looked sophisticated in an elegant bright yellow gown. 

Molly Shannon

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“Saturday Night Live” alum Molly Shannon attends the 74th Primetime Emmys. 

The comedian opted for a bright but simple look.

Carson Kressley, Michelle Visage, RuPaul and cast of “Drag Race”

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Carson Kressley, Michelle Visage, RuPaul and some of the cast of “RuPaul’s Drag Race” attend the 74th Primetime Emmys.

Colman Domingo

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Colman Domingo appears on the red carpet of the 74th Primetime Emmys in a strikingly bright look. 

The actor and director dressed in a shining silver suit with a see-through black undershirt for the event. 

 

Trevor Noah

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Comedian Trevor Noah attends the 74th Primetime Emmys in formal black tie attire. 

Kate McKinnon

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Richard Shotwell


“Saturday Night Live” star Kate McKinnon arrives at the 74th Primetime Emmy Awards in an all black suit. 

Desi Lydic

Desi Lydic

Danny Moloshok


Comedian and actress Desi Lydic looked elegant as ever on the red carpet of the 74th Emmy Awards. 

Melanie Lynskey

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Melanie Lynskey arrives at the 74th Emmy Awards in a Christian Siriano dress. 

The “Yellowjackets” star’s Christian Siriano gown was custom-made for her. 

Cynthia Addai-Robinson

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Actress Cynthia Addai-Robinson attends the 74th Primetime Emmys in style. 

Chloe Hilliard and Sydnee Washington

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Comedians Chloe Hilliard and Sydnee Washington pose together at the 74th Primetime Emmys. 

Connie Britton

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Actress Connie Britton stood out in this bright hot pink cape gown at the 74th Primetime Emmys. 

Ben Stiller and daughter Ella

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Ben Stiller and his daughter Ella complement each other as they walk the red carpet at the 74th Primetime Emmys in black ensembles. 

Kaley Cuoco

74th Primetime Emmys - Arrivals

Evans Vestal Ward/NBC via Getty Images


Actress and producer Kaley Cuoco looked pretty in pink as she walked the red carpet of the 2022 Emmys in this extravagant piece. 

Kaitlyn Dever

74th Primetime Emmys - Red Carpet

Mark Von Holden/NBC via Getty Images


Actress Kaitlyn Dever wore this off-the-shoulder red gown well as she walked the red carpet of the 2022 Emmys.

Amanda Seyfried

Amanda Seyfried

Jae C. Hong


Amanda Seyfried was shining in style on the red carpet of the 2022 Emmys. 

“The Dropout” star was nominated for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited or Anthology Series or Movie.

Sarah Paulson

74th Primetime Emmys - Red Carpet

Mark Von Holden/NBC via Getty Images


“Impeachment: American Crime Story” star Sarah Paulson arrives at the 74th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards in a very daring and eye-catching piece. 

Rhea Seehorn

Rhea Seehorn

Al Seib


All eyes were on actress and director Rhea Seehorn as she arrived at the 74th Emmy Awards in this dramatic look. 

Louis Cato and Stephan Colbert

74th Primetime Emmys - Arrivals

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Louis Cato and Stephan Colbert appear to be having a good time together as they pose for a photo on the red carpet of the 2022 Emmys. 

Rachel Brosnahan

74th Primetime Emmys - Red Carpet

Christopher Polk/NBC via Getty Images


Rachel Brosnahan hit the red carpet of the 2022 Emmys in this navy blue gown featuring pink stone embroidery. 

She topped off the look with a slicked back hairstyle. 

Tramell Tillman

74th Primetime Emmys - Arrivals

Trae Patton/NBC via Getty Images


“Severance” actor Tramell Tillman arrives at the 74th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards in a formal black tie suit. 

Mariska Hargitay

74th Primetime Emmys - Arrivals

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Actress Mariska Hargitay kept it classy as she walked the red carpet of the 2022 Emmys donning this black gown. 

Lauren Miller and Seth Rogen

Lauren Miller,Seth Rogen

Jae C. Hong


Actors Lauren Miller and Seth Rogen lean on each other as they pose for a photo on the red carpet of the 2022 Emmys. 

Quinta Brunson

74th Primetime Emmys - Arrivals

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Comedian and actress Quinta Brunson didn’t shy away from showing off some leg as she attended the 74th Primetime Emmys in this piece. 

Jung Ho-yeon

74th Primetime Emmys - Arrivals

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South Korean model and actress Jung Ho-yeon played off an old Hollywood bob hairstyle well at the 2022 Emmys. 

She co-stars in the hit show “Squid Game.”

Keeley Hawes and Matthew Macfadyen

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Keeley Hawes and Matthew Macfadyen pose together at the 74th Primetime Emmys.

Hawes stood out in a pink tulle gown as Macfadyen dressed in a classic tuxedo. 

Jasmin Savoy Brown

74th Primetime Emmys - Arrivals

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Jasmin Savoy Brown, known for her roles in “The Leftovers” and “Yellowjackets,” pulls off an edgy look at the 2022 Emmys.

Adam and Naomi Scott

74th Primetime Emmys - Arrivals

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Actors Adam and Naomi Scott pose together as they attend the 74th Primetime Emmys. 

Christina Ricci

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“Yellowjackets” actress Christina Ricci stuns in this sequin gown that includes gold sparkle as she attends the 74th Primetime Emmys. 

Kenan Thompson

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Comedian Kenan Thompson, host of the 74th Primetime Emmys, posed for a photo on the red carpet before the big show kicked off. 

Jean Smart

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“Hacks” star Jean Smart attends the 74th Primetime Emmys wearing an all white distinctive gown. 

Smart took home the award for Outstanding Lead Actress in Comedy Series this year. 

Hannah Einbinder

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Actress Hannah Einbinder of “Hacks” attends the 74th Primetime Emmys in a classic black gown. 

#Emmys #TVs #hottest #stars #red #carpet

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Apple’s iOS 16 Is Available Now: New Lock Screen, Editable Messages and Every Other Change

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Apple iOS 16 Now Available: Every New Feature You Should Know About

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This story is part of Focal Point iPhone 2022, CNET’s collection of news, tips and advice around Apple’s most popular product.

Apple’s big fall iOS 16 software update is now available to download, bringing new software features, tweaks and upgrades to how your iPhone works. Apple’s new mobile operating system is available for compatible iPhones on today. It’s generally compatible with 2017’s iPhone 8 and newer. The new iOS includes updates to Messages, a new customizable lock screen and new CAPTCHA privacy update for more secure log ins. Big changes are coming to Wallet too, but lesser-known features lurking in iOS 16 are worth checking out, too. 

Here’s every iOS 16 feature you should know about. Plus, check out the newly announced Apple Watch Series 8, Apple Watch Ultra and iPhone 14.

The ability to edit and ‘unsend’ messages

“Embarrassing typos are a thing of the past,” Craig Federighi, Apple’s senior vice president of software engineering, said at WWDC as he introduced three of the most requested features for the Messages app.

First, in iOS 16 you’ll be able to edit sent messages. So if you notice a typo after a message, you’ll be able to edit the message after the fact. A tiny “edited” appears in the status under the message.

A screenshot of the iOS 16 Messages app showing one that's been edited

In Messages, you can edit previously sent messages.


Apple

Next, and this might be my favorite new feature, you can immediately recall a sent message. If you accidentally send an unfinished message, you can use the Undo Send tool to prevent it from being read and hopefully look less chaotic to your friends and family.

Last, you can mark messages and threads as unread. This could be an excellent tool for when you don’t have time to respond to a message in the moment, but want to make sure you come back to it later.


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Testing iOS 16 (Edit/Delete Sent Messages, New Lock Screen…



16:22

A new customizable lock screen

One of the things you look at the most on your iPhone is the lock screen, especially if you have a Face ID-equipped iPhone. iOS 16 brings the most substantial update to the iPhone’s lock screen yet. Press and hold to edit your lock screen. You can swipe to try out several different styles. Each style changes the color filter for the background photo and the font on the lock screen so everything complements each other. This feels a bit like Apple’s take on Google’s Material You, which launched with Android 12.

You can also customize the fonts for the time and date, and add lock screen widgets like temperature, activity rings and a calendar. The widgets are akin to complications on the Apple Watch lock screen. 

Your iPhone will become more customizable in iOS 16. You’ll be able to choose how your lock screen looks, down to the font and color.


Apple

You can even set up multiple customized lock screens with different widgets and easily swipe to switch between them. There’s also a photo shuffle option that automatically changes the pictures on your lock screen.

One feature we’d been hoping to see Apple add was an always-on display. It’s something nearly all Android phones have; even the Apple Watch does. Well, with the new iPhone 14 Pro and iPhone 14 Pro Max, the always-on display has finally arrived.

A screenshot of the Live Activities tool on the bottom of the lock screen

iOS 16 adds a feature that developers can use called Live Activities. This is essentially a mini view of the real-time progress of a workout, sporting event or Uber ride from your iPhone’s lock screen.


Apple

Notifications and live activities

Sometimes notifications can cover up your lock screen’s photo, so iOS 16 moves notifications to the bottom of your display. As you receive them, instead of being compiled into a list, they appear like a vertical carousel. This not only looks better but should be a big help for one-handed use of your iPhone.

iOS 16 also aims to solve another notification problem. Sometimes you get a bunch of notifications in a row from one app, like the score of a basketball game. A new tool for developers called Live Activities makes it easier to stay on top of things happening in real time from your lock screen, instead of getting a series of interruptions.

Live Activities should make it easier to follow sporting events, workouts or even the progress of an Uber ride.

Skip CAPTCHAs using Private Access Tokens

The CAPTCHA — which stands for Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart — has been a necessary evil across the internet. CAPTCHAs are designed to make sure that a person is accessing a website or service, and not a bot. I find them annoying, as they often involve reading strangely written letters or having to find all the images that have a truck. With iOS 16, Apple plans to start replacing these awkward interactions with Private Access Tokens.

According to a video on Apple’s website demonstrating Private Access Tokens, websites that support the token will essentially log in and authenticate that you are indeed a human without your having to play any of the usual CAPTCHA games. Apple says in the video that the company is working with other companies to roll out support for this feature, so we can’t say the CAPTCHA will be dead after iOS 16 rolls out to the public. But the concept could provide some relief if it gets adopted.

Wallet and Apple Pay Later

ID cards from more states will be available in your Wallet app along with more security and privacy features. In iOS 16 you can also protect your identity and age. So rather than showing your exact birth date, the Wallet app will display your ID and that you’re over 21.

iOS 16 makes sharing keys easier with apps like Mail and Messages. When your friend receives the key, they can add it to the Wallet app on their iPhone. Apple said it’s working to make sure that shared keys are an industry standard and free for others.

A screenshot of cards in the Wallet app for iOS 16

The Wallet app in iOS 16 gets a bunch of small but notable updates, including the Apple Pay Later payment plan.


Apple

Apple Pay will support new types of payments and adds a new feature called Apple Pay Later, a Klarna-like service that lets you split the cost of an Apple Pay purchase into four equal payments spread over six weeks, with zero interest and no fees. Upcoming payments are managed through the Wallet app, making it easy to keep track of dates and payments.

But Apple Pay doesn’t stop there. A new feature will also help you track Apple Pay orders and lets merchants deliver detailed receipts and tracking information. This should make it easier to stay up to date on the status of all your orders.

A screenshot of a thread in Messages where a cutout of a dog is added

You can tap and hold on the subject of a photo and separate it from the background. Then you can drag it into another app like Messages to share it.


Apple

Visual Look Up’s tap and drag for photos

In iOS 15, Visual Look Up analyzes your photos and can identify objects like plants, landmarks and pets. iOS 16 takes this to the next level. When you touch a photo’s subject like the dog in the image above, you can lift it away from the background and add it to apps like Messages. Essentially it’s a tap-and-hold tool that removes a photo’s background.

Apple sometimes overuses the word “magic,” but this feature truly seems like it.

Craig Federighi introduces SharePlay in Messages in front of a giant screen

During the keynote for WWDC, Apple executive Craig Federighi introduces SharePlay for the Messages app.


Apple

SharePlay comes to Messages

SharePlay, which debuted in iOS 15, lets you have a shared experience while connecting with someone over FaceTime. You can watch TV shows, listen to music in sync and other things. iOS 16 adds the ability to discover more apps that support SharePlay from within FaceTime.

But perhaps one of the coolest things Apple did for SharePlay was to make it work within the Messages app. Apple said that this was one of the biggest requests from app developers. Now when you want to share a movie on Disney Plus, you can start SharePlay together with a friend while chatting in Messages.

An Apple executive presents the Safety Check feature during the WWDC keynote

Safety Check lets you quickly reset location sharing and access to passwords. It’s intended to be helpful for people in abusive relationships.


Apple

Safety Check aims to help people in abusive relationships

Safety Check is a new feature intended to be helpful for people in abusive relationships. It lets you review and reset who has access to location information as well as passwords, messages and other apps on an iPhone.

Focus mode updates and Focus filters

Focus mode gets several updates. The first applies Focus behaviors to widgets and lock screen looks. So you could have one lock screen set for when your Work Focus is enabled and another for workouts.

Apple added specific Focus filters that apply your iPhone’s Focus mode within apps. For example, in Safari, you can limit what tabs are shown depending on what Focus mode you have active.

Apple Maps adds transit fare cards

Maps will get several updates. You’ll be able to plan trips with up to 15 different stops along the way. If you start planning a trip with the Maps app on your Mac, you’ll be able to share that to your iPhone.

And in something similar to what Google announced for Google Wallet in Android 13, you’ll be able to see transit fare estimates as well as add more money to a fare card from within Apple Maps.

Craig Federighi shows off the new Quick Start feature during the WWDC keynote

In iOS 16 you’ll be able to customize Quick Start with a specific child’s iCloud parental controls and settings.


Apple

iCloud family checklist

iCloud gets several new features. One of the more interesting ones is the option to quickly set up a new device for your child. When Quick Start appears, you have the option to pick a user for the new device and use all the existing parental controls you’ve previously selected and configured. However, this is not what many of us still want: the ability to set up separate users for the same device.

There’s a new family checklist with tips for updating settings for your kids as they get older, like a reminder to check location-sharing settings or share your iCloud Plus subscriptions.

For more, check out everything Apple announced at its Sept. 7 “Far Out” event. Plus, here’s how to download iOS 16.

#Apples #iOS #Lock #Screen #Editable #Messages #Change

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Ethereum Merge: Crypto’s Carbon Footprint Is About to Shrink

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Ethereum Merge: Crypto’s Carbon Footprint Is About to Shrink

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Google “Ethereum Merge” and you’ll see a cute countdown clock depicting two pandas, one black and one white, slowly getting closer to each other. When the countdown hits zero some time on Sept. 14, the two pandas will become one. The beguiling metaphor beguiles the importance of the Ethereum Merge to everyone, not just cryptocurrency supporters. 

Ethereum is the second biggest blockchain, behind only bitcoin, and currenctly emits carbon dioxide roughly equivalent to that of Singapore. If it’s successful, the Merge will lower ethereum’s massive electricity requirements by over 99%.

That is of huge consequence. Skeptics of cryptocurrency typically argue that coins like bitcoin and ether are useless, and that they consume enormous amounts of electricity. The first point is polarizing and subjective, but the second is unequivocally true. In an era when more people than ever view climate change mitigation as society’s highest priority, the carbon emissions of bitcoin and ethereum are too conspicuous to ignore. 

In the Merge, ethereum will adopt a system known as proof of stake, which has been planned since 2014, before the blockchain’s creation. Because of its technical complexity, and the increasingly large amount of money at risk, it has been delayed multiple times. The Merge is part of what in the past was called “ether 2.0,” a series of upgrades that reshape the blockchain’s foundations.

“We’ve been working on proof of stake for about seven years now,” ethereum co-creator Vitalik Buterin said at the Eth Shanghai conference in March, “but finally all of that work is coming together.” 

The Ethereum Mege is scheduled to occur between Sept. 13 and Sept. 15. Here’s what you need to know to make sense of the big day.

Why is crypto bad for the environment? 

To understand the Merge, you first need to understand the role of cryptocurrency miners.

Say you wanted to mine cryptocurrency. You’d set up a powerful computer — a “mining rig” — to run software that attempts to solve complex cryptographic puzzles. Your rig competes with hundreds of thousands of miners around the world trying to solve the same puzzle. If your computer unscrambles the cryptography first, you win the right to “validate” a block — that is, add new data to the blockchain. Doing so gives you a reward: Bitcoin miners get 6.25 bitcoin ($129,000) for every block they verify, while ethereum miners get 2 ether ($2,400) plus gas, which are the fees users pay on each transaction (which can be huge).

It takes a powerful computer to have a chance in this race, and people typically set up warehouses full of rigs for this purpose. This system is called “proof of work,” and it’s how both bitcoin and ethereum blockchains run. 

“It’s what’s called the Sybil resistance mechanism,” said Jon Charbonneau, an analyst at Delphi Digital. Every blockchain needs to run on a scarce resource, Charbonneau explained, one that bad actors can’t monopolize. For proof-of-work blockchains, that resource is power – in the form of the electricity required to run a mining operation.

To overtake ethereum right now, a bad actor would need to control 51% of the network’s power. The network is made up of hundreds of thousands of computers around the world, meaning bad guys would need to control 51% of the power in this vast mining pool. Doing so would cost billions of dollars. 

The system is secure. Though scams and hacks are common in crypto, neither the bitcoin nor ethereum blockchains themselves have been compromised in the past. The downside, however, is obvious. As cryptographic puzzles become more complicated and more miners compete to solve them, energy expenditure soars.

How much energy does crypto use?

Lots and lots. Bitcoin is estimated to consume about 150 terawatt hours a year, which is more electricity than 45 million people in Argentina use. Ethereum is closer to Switzerland’s 9 million citizens, eating up about 62 million terawatt hours.

Much of that energy comes from renewable sources. About 57% of the energy used to mine bitcoin comes from renewable sources, according to the Bitcoin Mining Council. (BMC relies on self reporting among its members.) This is motivated not by climate conscientiousness but self interest: Renewable energy is cheap, so mining operations are often set up near wind, solar or hydro farms.

Still, the carbon footprint is extensive. Ethereum is estimated to emit carbon dioxide at a similar scale to Denmark.

How will the Merge help?

The Merge will see ethereum completely shed proof of work, the energy-intensive system it currently uses, in favor of proof of stake. 

In crypto land, “staking” refers to depositing cryptocurrency to a protocol. Sometimes this can be to yield interest. For instance, the creators of the terraUSD stablecoin offered customers 19% interest on staked TerraUSD: You could put in $10,000 and take out $11,900 after a year (until it imploded).

Other times, as in the case of a proof-of-stake blockchain, staked cryptocurrency helps secure a protocol. As we’ll see shortly, the more ether is staked, the more secure the blockchain will be after the Merge. 

When proof of stake comes into effect, miners will no longer have to solve cryptographic puzzles to verify new blocks. Instead, they’ll deposit ether tokens into a pool. Imagine each of these tokens is a lottery ticket: If your token number is called, you win the right to verify the next block and earn the rewards that entails. 

It’s still an expensive enterprise. Prospective block verifiers — who will be known as “validators” instead of miners — need to stake a minimum of 32 ether ($48,500) to be eligible. This system sees punters put up raw capital, rather than power, to validate blocks. Whereas a bad actor needs 51% of a network’s power to overrun a proof-of-work system, they’d need 51% of the total staked ether to overrun the proof-of-stake system. The more total ether is staked, the safer the network becomes as the cost of reaching 51% of it’s capital increases. 

Since cryptographic puzzles will no longer be part of the system, electricity expenditure will go down an estimated 99.65%, according to the Ethereum Foundation.

Why is it called ‘the Merge’?

Ethereum will transition from proof of work to proof of stake through a merging of two blockchains.

The ethereum blockchain that people use is known as “mainnet,” as distinguished from various “testnet” blockchains that are used only by developers. In December 2020, ethereum developers created a new network called the “beacon chain”. The beacon chain is essentially the new ethereum.

The beacon chain is a proof-of-stake chain that’s been chugging along in isolation since its creation 19 months ago. Validators have been adding blocks to the chain, but these blocks have contained no data or transactions. It’s like a bus doing routes with no passengers just to make sure the engine runs properly. 

The Merge will see the data held on ethereum’s mainnet transferred to the beacon chain, which will then become the prime blockchain on ethereum’s network. In the run-up to the Merge, ethereum developers have been stress testing the new blockchain by running data and transactions through it on various ethereum testnets. 

“From speaking to ethereum developers, they’ve felt confident that had proof-of-work mining been, say, banned overnight, they could do the Merge even months ago and it would work,” Charbonneau said. The worry is that there would be some bugs on Ethereum “clients” — software that can read ethereum data and mine blocks — that could take months to fix. 

The Merge has been delayed many times over the last couple of years. Ethereum’s developers are being extra careful, Charbonneau said, to ensure the different clients validators use can work together at the time of the Merge. 

Are there any risks? 

Absolutely. Critics of ethereum — typically bitcoin enthusiasts — compare the merge to changing the engine of an airplane in the middle of a passenger flight. At stake is not just the airplane, but the $188 billion worth of ether in circulation.

On a technical level, there could be many unforeseen bugs with the new blockchain. Solana, another proof-of-stake blockchain, has suffered several complete outages this year. Solana and ethereum differ in that solana’s fees are minuscule, which means it’s easier for bots to overwhelm the blockchain, but technical difficulties aren’t out of the question.

Critics also wonder whether proof of stake will be as secure as proof of work. Charbonneau reckons it could be safer because of a function called “slashing” – in essence, validators can have their staked ether burned, and their network access revoked, if they’re found to have acted maliciously. 

“Say someone 51% attacks bitcoin today, you can’t really do anything,” Charbonneau said. “They have all the miners and they could just keep attacking you. With proof of stake, it’s really simple. If you attack the network, it’s provable and we just slash you, and then your money’s gone.”

“You get one bullet, and then that’s it. Then you can’t do it again.” 

Will it cause the price of ether to go up?

Ether is down about 55% since the beginning of the year, and many are hoping the Merge will revive its price. This has been a hotly debated topic within crypto circles in recent months, and no one knows for sure what the Merge will do the ether’s price. 

There are two primary reasons people predict ether’s price will skyrocket following the Merge. First is the idea that ethereum fractioning its carbon footprint will make it easier for big companies to both invest in ether and create ethereum applications. 

“The reality is, if you take the environmental caring part away, there are a lot of people who are not going to use it [ethereum] and not want to invest in it just based on ESG reasons,” Charbonneau said, referring to environmental, social and corporate governance standards for ethical investing. “There are a lot of tech companies that have openly said, ‘we are not going to do anything until after the Merge.'” 

This argument was backed up by two Bank of America analysts, who on Friday wrote: “”The significant reduction in energy consumption post-Merge may enable some institutional investors to purchase the token that were previously prohibited from purchasing tokens that run on blockchains leveraging proof of work (PoW) consensus mechanisms.” 

The second argument people make is a little more technical. Mining ethereum is costly; as electricity prices have gone up and crypto prices have gone down, even successful mining operations have begun to see red. To offset costs, miners typically sell most of the cryptocurrency they earn from mining. That creates millions of dollars of sell pressure each day as miners offload their ether. Once ethereum is proof of stake, miners (or “validators” as they’ll be called) won’t have to sell all the ether they earn, since validating blocks is so much cheaper than mining them via proof of work cryptography. 

Others argue, however, that the Merge is already priced in. It’s been in the works for seven years and many big-time investors, the argument goes, have put money on ethereum with the expectation that the Merge would be successful. 

When will the Merge happen? 

The Merge is currently schedued to go ahead between Sept. 13 and Sept. 15, according to ethereum creator Vitalik Buterin. Google’s Merge countdown estimates the change to execute at around 10 p.m. PT time on Wednesday, Sept. 14. 



#Ethereum #Merge #Cryptos #Carbon #Footprint #Shrink

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Speak No Evil’s Director Explains Why He Made Such a Shocking Film

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Speak No Evil’s Director Explains Why He Made Such a Shocking Film

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A man watches a woman in the shower.

Image: Shudder/IFC Midnight

Danish import Speak No Evil was one of the standouts at this year’s Sundance Film Festival—anyone who saw it then is likely still traumatized by it. Elegant filmmaking propels its story of two families who meet on vacation, hit it off, and decide to visit again… with decidedly less pleasant results. With Speak No Evil arriving in theaters and on Shudder this month, io9 got a chance to speak with director Christian Tafdrup about his excellent but uniquely agonizing movie.

Note: this interview was conducted over video chat and has been slightly edited for clarity. (There’s also a spoiler warning near the end just before the film’s last act is discussed.)


Cheryl Eddy, io9: I saw Speak No Evil at Sundance and then I rewatched it ahead of talking to you. And I have to say, the rewatch was even more uncomfortable than the first time. Was it your intention to make a movie that people might only be able to see once?

Christian Tafdrup: No, but it’s funny because I think most films we only watch once. A lot of Danish critics wrote, “I love the film, but I don’t want to watch it again.” And I mean, it’s not like I watched The Godfather many times; there’s a lot of movies I only watched once. So I was not thinking so much about that. But a lot of people have said that: “I will only watch it once,” or “I love the film, but I will not recommend it to anybody.” That’s how the Danish critics went—they loved it, but they kind of made it that angle on it. So we didn’t think so much about that, but we did agree that we wanted to make not just a disturbing film, but the most disturbing film in Denmark’s film history ever. That was our promise to each other, me and the other screenwriter [Mads Tafdrup], from the beginning.

Of course, it was because we wanted to give ourselves a challenge. And then also because I think we don’t have that many disturbing films in Denmark besides [those] of Lars von Trier. So I thought it would be suitable if Danish cinema had some more disturbing films. And I like when films are disturbing, but I was also feeling a little stupid in the beginning when I said it, because what if the film could not live up to that? Then it would be very embarrassing. So I’m kind of happy that people find it very disturbing and that I know so many people who don’t dare go see it. Some people are really afraid of horror films—in a way I understand it; in another way, I don’t, because it’s not that bad. I mean, there are not any jump scares or supernatural creepy, you know, aliens [in Speak No Evil]. The disturbing things are in the relations between people. And it’s in a very, I think, intimate way and recognizable way—maybe it’s that they are the real horror, [which is] something I find very interesting.

Image for article titled Speak No Evil's Director Explains Why He Made Such a Shocking Movie

Image: Shudder/IFC Midnight

io9: I was going to ask you about that. The characters are all recognizable people who feel real, for better and worse. Did you draw any inspiration from real life or real situations?

Tafdrup: Yeah. More than I even [realize] myself, I build a lot on personal stuff. I’ve had travels like [the characters in Speak No Evil] where I’ve met people on holidays, socialized with them, and then saw them again and had, you know, another experience. I thought that situation was almost like a comedy, but I wanted to take it to a darker place. And then, becoming a father and having a family—there’s a lot of small situations in the film that I was aware of from my own life. When you write and you’re interested in storytelling, you live your life, but you also see it from the outside all the time. If I find something I do myself or a situation that is funny, I write it down. And then years later, it’s in the film.

So in many ways it was built on my own experiences and then of course, added a lot of imagination to make it into a film. From the beginning I wanted to work with characters that were very ordinary, having normal lives. What does that look like when you meet something that is disturbing? I mean, we live safe lives here in Denmark and probably most of the Western world. We’ve got a lot of privilege; I’m not used to violence every day or war or anything. So how would normal people react when somebody wants to do bad things to them? I really looked into myself and said, “Maybe first of all, I would try to be friendly or smile or talk my way out of it because I don’t know how to fight.” And that’s a good thing, because it’s a very human thing to expect the best out of people. But if some people sometimes don’t want to do good things to you, do you have the tools to to fight back, or do you even have the tools to recognize evilness?

I thought that was a very, very scary and interesting take on a horror film and something that I can relate to in a modern world. It was a way to, all the time, start with what is ordinary, what is normal, what is recognizable, and then combine it with something that was more [horrific]. So that is maybe what I discovered doing it, that it’s in a way a very realistic horror movie.

Image for article titled Speak No Evil's Director Explains Why He Made Such a Shocking Movie

Image: Shudder/IFC Midnight

io9: Yeah. I can’t say I’ve ever seen a movie that taps so precisely into the horrors of, like, boundary-pushing and micro-aggressions. Did you know from the beginning that something you were going to lean into?

Tafdrup: Some of the first themes that came to my mind [came about because of] how many bad situations I’ve been in in my life—I mean, not really, really bad, but bad. Out of being polite, I wanted to please other people, and I just sacrificed how I really felt; I was taking care of my social behavior more than my gut instinct. Pretending [became] more important than my primitive human nature and what all these [red flags] were saying to me. All these things we do because we want to be [nice to other people] is something I think is very human, and very good in many ways. But it also has some problems because you let other people push your boundaries and even though your gut feeling tells you it’s wrong, you kind of ignore that. You turn a blind eye to it. Also, it’s very awkward to speak up. You don’t want conflict. Not everyone is like that, but I know far more that are like that—they want to ignore when something bad happens.

That was [one of the core] themes: how we can stretch that “want to keep up the good atmosphere and not speak up” for a long time? In the movie, we have a couple that’s being tested right from the beginning and it gets worse and worse and worse. But I think the thing that was difficult to work with—but also what I think succeeds in many ways—is the balance in the situations where you’re always doubting: “am I just misunderstanding this?” You can always turn it inside yourself and say, “Oh, it might be me, I’m also a little bit sensitive and I’m a guest so maybe [I should just forget it].” If you excuse that all the time, it can lead to some fatal conclusions. We worked a lot with that throughout the film, the balance of the ways they’re being tested and what their reactions were.

Image for article titled Speak No Evil's Director Explains Why He Made Such a Shocking Movie

Image: Shudder/IFC Midnight

io9: The characters may not realize they’re getting into something dangerous, but the audience definitely has a clue from the very beginning. One of those ways you telegraph that is through the score. What was your roadmap when it came to designing the soundscape of the movie?

Tafdrup: I remember we tried out many things and we were also doubting for a long time—is this a horror film or not? But I kept coming back to, “I want to make a horror film.” And then we used some of the horror conventions or clichés that we liked; one of them was, of course, music. And we had a problem with the film, to be honest, in that—I mean, it’s not that scary for a long time. We started out with having another score just for fun, that was more romantic and trying not to tell people that something bad will happen, and then people could not code what kind of movie it is. They thought it was like, Call Me By Your Name 2, or some romantic drama with two men falling in love, because the music told you that.

But then we discovered that some horror movies have very, very nice scenes but the music tells you something else. If you think of the beginning of The Shining, for instance: it’s a beautiful shot, but the music tells you this is going wrong. And I was very inspired by that—the music is almost like a destiny for these people. [Neither the family nor the audience] knows that it’s going to be bad, but it’s an invitation to say, “We are going to a bad place together.” I like to play it out like that, to go against the images. With the composer [Sune Kølster], we talked about “Let’s make it large. Let’s agree that it’s like an opera, because it should not only understate the feelings of the characters, it should be almost like a character itself.” We wanted to make the film elevated and have a lot of symbolism and a lot of darkness to it. So we took some chances there on making the score really big, and some people really like that and some really think it’s not good. But I ended up really enjoying that we made that decision.

Image for article titled Speak No Evil's Director Explains Why He Made Such a Shocking Movie

Image: Shudder/IFC Midnight

io9: You mentioned the relationship between the two men, which to me is the most fascinating one in the movie. How would you characterize that relationship between Bjørn (Morten Burian) and Patrick (Fedja van Huêt)—and what is it about Patrick that you think Bjørn really latches onto even when he knows he shouldn’t?

Tafdrup: We talked a lot about that, that Patrick should almost be the dark side of Bjørn—something he longs to be, but something he’s not capable of any more. What the film is really about, for me, is people that are suppressing darkness. Bjørn is a man who lives a very safe, nice life, but he’s not in contact any more with his basic human nature … and if you do that too long, if you’re not more in contact with your own dark side, you kind of long for that. I think he gets very attracted to Patrick who is more primitive, more typically masculine, more in contact with whatever he feels. He can be charming and then he can lie and then he can be nice and then he can be scary. Bjørn is longing to meet somebody who is like that, because that’s what he misses in himself … if we cannot admit that we are human beings with good and bad thoughts and feelings and all that, then I think you can go to a very dangerous place like Bjørn does, and fall for somebody that’s too much, you know? That’s what the relationship between them is like: Patrick is the dark side of that modern guy who’s too dictated by behaving nicely and doing the right thing all the time.

Image for article titled Speak No Evil's Director Explains Why He Made Such a Shocking Movie

Image: Shudder/IFC Midnight

Image for article titled Speak No Evil's Director Explains Why He Made Such a Shocking Movie

io9: At one point, early on, one of the characters jokingly asks the rhetorical question, “What’s the worst that can happen?” And then the movie basically shows you exactly the very worst that could happen. Were there any taboos that you shied away from when you were writing? Was the movie ever more extreme?

Tafdrup: We had a third act, an ending, until a week before shooting where the plot was a little bit different—the execution in the end was an execution of a lot of people. There were 30 people, because there were also all these other houses who had guests. So it was more like a sect, like a big plot, and everybody was executed in different ways. [But we would have] needed 50 extras and it just became too crazy—and I had some trouble explaining that ending. So we kind of, just the day before shooting, I thought, “Let’s just have one couple being murdered, and let’s just have one way of being executed.” I came up with the stoning because it fit with this more Biblical, mythological, opera-like feeling I wanted it to have. So I think it was the same in a way, but [that other ending] felt a little bit more like, “Oh, we want to be extreme and be provocative.” So I ended up keeping it more simple.

Then, sometimes [while] writing the film and also trying to get funding [we reconsidered] a little bit, because many people wanted more hope. They wanted us to rewrite the ending so that [the characters] maybe escaped or we had some more hope to it. But we discovered if we had done that, it would have been a totally different film. We remembered that we wanted to do a disturbing film and not a film where the characters come home and are better people. That’s just such a typical way of how we could have done it, but we stuck to, “Let’s not have any hope in the end, let’s make it totally black.” And that took some guts, I must say. But it was worth it because that’s what the premise of the film is.

io9: Why do you think Patrick and Karin (Karina Smulders) do what they do? Was that something you deliberately left unanswered?

Tafdrup: That was a question we had [a lot] while testing the film. I understand why, but many people ask “Why are they doing this? I need an explanation. Are they criminals? Did they want their money? Are they wanting to sacrifice them to some God?” And every time we tried to answer that, the film for me became more flat. It became more “Okay, that’s why.” I think many horror movies have a bad tendency to do that, to explain themselves in the ending. What I was interested in was more like an image of evilness. For me, Patrick and Karin were just the devil, devils, Mr. and Mrs. Devil—and they might have fun doing this.

But what I was really interested in [exploring] was ordinary people’s reactions to evilness, and in this case, they’re permitting it themselves. They could have driven home, but they didn’t. So it’s a way of seeing that evilness exists in the world, and how will you relate to it. The film is an allegory, an adventure in that sense. It’s not like psychological realism. I think has film taught us that we have to have explanations all the time. But it would have been another film if I had said, “Okay, they are vampires,” or “They need their money.” I like that people can think and discuss and that film can be more symbolic. But it took a lot of a lot of discussion, [the decision] not to to explain.

Image for article titled Speak No Evil's Director Explains Why He Made Such a Shocking Movie

Image: Shudder/IFC Midnight

Speak No Evil is now playing in select theaters; it hits Shudder on September 15.


Want more io9 news? Check out when to expect the latest Marvel and Star Wars releases, what’s next for the DC Universe on film and TV, and everything you need to know about House of the Dragon and Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power.

#Speak #Evils #Director #Explains #Shocking #Film

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Week 1 takeaways and big questions: Bucs stifle Cowboys; bad losses for Bengals, Patriots, Titans and 49ers

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Week 1 takeaways and big questions: Bucs stifle Cowboys; bad losses for Bengals, Patriots, Titans and 49ers

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Week 1 of the 2022 NFL season — we saw it all.

Quarterback Tom Brady and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers took care of business on the road against the Dallas Cowboys on Sunday night, as Cowboys quarterback Dak Prescott struggled to get anything going against the Bucs’ defense. And that was before Prescott left the game late because of a right hand injury.

Earlier in the day, turnovers were the name of the game in Cincinnati, with the Pittsburgh Steelers forcing five against Bengals quarterback Joe Burrow — including a pick-six. But the teams went back and forth until the Steelers won it in overtime with a field goal. Speaking of field goals, the Tennessee Titans missed a potential game winner in the late-afternoon window Sunday, allowing the New York Giants to come back from a 13-point deficit and win their first season opener in six years.

Multiple quarterbacks made debuts with new teams in the early window. Baker Mayfield played his first game in a Panthers uniform against his old team, the Cleveland Browns. Matt Ryan — in his 15th season — led the Indianapolis Colts to a tie against the Houston Texans. Washington Commanders rookie Jahan Dotson caught his first — and second — career touchdown pass from Carson Wentz, leading to a win over the Jacksonville Jaguars.

As far as holdovers, Patrick Mahomes looked as good as ever in the late-afternoon window as the Kansas City Chiefs romped to a victory over the Arizona Cardinals.

Our NFL Nation reporters react with the biggest takeaways and lingering questions coming out of this week’s matchups and look ahead to what’s next. Let’s get to it.

Jump to a matchup:
LAR-BUF | NE-MIA | CLE-CAR | BAL-NYJ

CHI-SF | JAX-WSH | PIT-CIN | IND-HOU
NO-ATL | PHI-DET | KC-ARI | GB-MIN
LV-LAC | NYG-TEN | TB-DAL

Buccaneers

What to know: In Todd Bowles’ debut as the Buccaneers’ head coach, Tampa Bay held the Cowboys to a field goal and Dak Prescott to a quarterback rating of 47.2. Prescott struggled to complete a pass beyond 5 yards. Dropped interceptions were still an issue, though, but the Bucs managed one interception from Antoine Winfield Jr. Tom Brady, who became the first quarterback in NFL history to start a game at age 45, threw for 212 yards and a 5-yard touchdown to Mike Evans in the third quarter. For as well as the Bucs moved the ball, they struggled on third down (4-of-11) and in the red zone (1-for-3), although running back Leonard Fournette was a bright spot, rushing for 127 yards on 21 carries. In his much-anticipated Buccaneers debut, Julio Jones produced some wow moments, including a stunning 48-yard grab when he reached 20.62 mph.

Will the Bucs be doomed by injuries? Left tackle Donovan Smith left the game because of a right elbow injury and did not return, and wide receiver Chris Godwin — who saw action for the first time since tearing an ACL and MCL on Dec. 19 — left the game because of a hamstring injury. Godwin’s injury is less of a concern given the Bucs’ depth at receiver, and the Bucs won’t have to deal with an outside linebacker like Micah Parsons on a weekly basis, but Josh Wells struggled in Smith’s absence, and the Bucs are already missing Pro Bowl center Ryan Jensen. Making matters worse is the fact that the Bucs travel to the New Orleans Saints next week — a defense that has had their number. In fact, the Bucs haven’t defeated the Saints in the regular season since 2018. — Jenna Laine

Next game: at Saints (1 p.m. ET, Sunday)


Cowboys

What to know: The Cowboys kept saying the offense would be fine. No wide receivers Amari Cooper (traded to Cleveland), Michael Gallup (coming back from a knee injury) or Cedrick Wilson Jr. (signed with Miami). No offensive tackle Tyron Smith (out until December). No offensive guard Connor Williams (see: Wilson). Sunday’s loss to the Buccaneers proved all of that to be untrue. The Cowboys have issues, and it got worse late in the fourth quarter when Dak Prescott went to the locker room because of a right hand injury. Before the injury, Prescott had a miserable evening even when not under duress. For the first time since the 2001 season opener, the Cowboys failed to score a touchdown. Their opponent that day? Tampa Bay. But that was former Cowboys quarterback Quincy Carter’s first career start.

What type of faith do the Cowboys have in Cooper Rush? The Cowboys’ backup quarterback won the only start of his career last year at Minnesota when Prescott had a calf strain. He threw for 325 yards on 24-of-40 passing, but he doesn’t have Cooper or Wilson to throw to this year. “I mean, it sucks obviously [losing Prescott] in Week 1, but we’ve got a ton of confidence in Coop,” Pro Bowl right guard Zack Martin said. “He’s been in there before with us, won games with us before. So we’ve got to rally around him and steady the ship until [Prescott] gets back.” — Todd Archer

Next game: vs. Bengals (4:25 p.m. ET, Sunday)

Giants

What to know: Saquon Barkley is back! He finished with 194 total yards and had a 2-point conversion with 1:06 remaining that gave the Giants a lead they barely held. The Titans missed a potential winning field goal as time expired, and New York won its opener for the first time since 2016, which also happens to be the last time it made the playoffs. It was possible because Barkley did a little bit of everything. He had a 68-yard run in the third quarter (the Giants’ longest play from scrimmage since Daniel Jones‘ 80-yard stumble and run in Week 7 of 2020), caught six passes out of the backfield and made big plays when needed in the fourth quarter. The performance was vintage Barkley. Explosive and dynamic, and he even ran harder for tough yards than during his eye-popping rookie year. All positive developments for this Giants team and new coach Brian Daboll.

What are the Giants doing with Kadarius Toney? Toney didn’t start. He also barely played. When he did touch the ball early in the fourth quarter on a jet sweep, it went for a 19-yard rush. Toney, the Giants’ first-round pick last year, was on the field for just seven offensive snaps in the contest, even with rookie slot receiver Wan’Dale Robinson leaving in the first half because of a knee injury. It didn’t matter. Richie James played ahead of him. The Giants didn’t want to play Toney, who needs to earn the trust of the new regime. He finished with two rushes for 23 yards, which left you wondering whether he is really a major part of their plans this season and moving forward. — Jordan Raanan

Next game: vs. Panthers (1 p.m. ET, Sunday)


Titans

What to know: The Titans couldn’t move the ball consistently enough to win. The Giants held Derrick Henry to 82 rushing yards, so Tennessee relied mostly on a balanced pass attack. Because the Titans don’t have a clear-cut No. 1 receiver, they’ll have to rely on a committee approach until someone emerges. This week it was rookie Kyle Phillips, who led the way with six receptions for 66 yards. Dontrell Hilliard had three receptions for 61 yards and two touchdowns, both of which came in mismatches against Giants linebackers. Treylon Burks caught three passes for 55 yards. Offseason acquisitions Robert Woods (one catch) and Austin Hooper (one catch) came out on the short end of the stick this week.

Can the Titans’ front four hold up against the Bills? The Titans sacked Daniel Jones five times. Four sacks came in the first half, with the Titans blitzing only one time in that span. Jones was under constant duress from Tennessee’s front four, led by Jeffery Simmons and Rashad Weaver, who finished with two sacks each. Bud Dupree had the other sack for Tennessee. Dropping seven back in coverage consistently helped keep Jones under 200 passing yards. A similar performance by Simmons and the front four will allow the Titans to blitz less and keep seven guys in coverage next week against Josh Allen and the Bills’ potent attack. — Turron Davenport

Next game: at Bills (7:15 p.m. ET, Monday)

Chargers

What to know: The Chargers’ offseason additions, signifying they were all-in for a long playoff run this season, made their presence felt, including newcomer tight end Gerald Everett and receiver DeAndre Carter, who both scored touchdowns. On defense, edge rusher Khalil Mack, whom the Bolts acquired in a blockbuster trade last March, sacked quarterback Derek Carr three times, and cornerback Bryce Callahan, who signed in free agency, grabbed one of three interceptions.

Will the Chargers have key playmakers available in a quick turnaround for Thursday night? Cornerback J.C. Jackson, the NFL’s interceptions leader since 2018, was inactive Sunday as he continues to recover from ankle surgery last month. Jackson’s timetable to return was two to four weeks, so there’s a possibility he’ll be ready to play Thursday night against the Chiefs. And receiver Keenan Allen caught four passes for 66 yards before he left Sunday’s game in the first half because of a hamstring injury and did not return. — Lindsey Thiry

Next game: at Chiefs (8:15 p.m. ET, Thursday)


Raiders

What to know: Maybe the Raiders’ starters should have played a series, or three, in the preseason? Given how off a few of Derek Carr‘s throws were, timing was an issue. He missed an early touchdown by throwing behind Darren Waller, and two of his career-high three interceptions were underthrown, to Waller and Davante Adams, while his third was behind Hunter Renfrow. This was something that could have been worked out in actual game situations, especially because the Raiders were learning a new system under coach Josh McDaniels, no?

Is the offensive line a finished product? How about no. Not after Carr was sacked six times and Las Vegas used three different combinations at what is supposed to be one of the more stable units in the game. Starting rookie Dylan Parham at right guard before replacing him with Lester Cotton Sr., and then having Parham return, then having seventh-round rookie Thayer Munford Jr. replace Jermaine Eluemunor, and Eluemunor return late, says this is a fluid situation. — Paul Gutierrez

Next game: vs. Cardinals (4:25 p.m. ET, Sunday)

Vikings

What to know: New coach Kevin O’Connell had the Vikings ready to play, even after a preseason in which starters played sparingly or not at all and a training camp that prioritized injury prevention over physical reps. The Vikings’ defense was especially violent, led by new outside linebacker Za’Darius Smith, and battered quarterback Aaron Rodgers with four sacks.

Did the Vikings catch the Packers by surprise, or is this success sustainable? It’s a reasonable question, given the Vikings were debuting a new scheme that they had studiously avoided giving any glimpses of during the preseason. Their defensive play can be sustained as long as the Vikings maintain Sunday’s level of physicality. Offensively, future opponents will study how O’Connell got receiver Justin Jefferson open for nine catches, 184 yards and two touchdowns. They’ll have to continue to evolve there. — Kevin Seifert

Next game: at Eagles (8:30 p.m. ET, Monday)


Packers

What to know: Season openers don’t matter: At least that’s the way the Packers seem to treat them. This was almost as bad as last year’s 38-3 Week 1 loss to the Saints, and the Packers still managed to win 13 games that season. Most teams devise game plans for regular-season games. It didn’t seem like the Packers did much of that, at least not when it came to Vikings receiver Justin Jefferson (nine catches for 184 yards and two touchdowns). It’s not like the Packers didn’t know they needed to stop No. 18, but it sure looked like they didn’t try. He wasn’t just open — he was wide open. And why give cornerback Jaire Alexander a $30 million signing bonus this offseason if you’re not going to have him shadow the best receiver in the NFC North?

What’s a bigger concern, the Packers’ offense or defense? At this point, it’s the defense. Coordinator Joe Barry had all 11 of his preferred starters available (12 if you count slot cornerback Rasul Douglas). On paper, this was supposed to be the best defense the Packers had in years. On the field, it looked like a paper tiger. At least Aaron Rodgers & Co. had an excuse: No Allen Lazard (ankle), the presumptive No. 1 receiver, and neither starting tackle, as David Bakhtiari and Elgton Jenkins continue to work their way back from knee injuries. It might have been different early had rookie receiver Christian Watson not dropped a would-be 75-yard touchdown pass on the Packers’ first offensive play and had AJ Dillon not gotten stuffed on fourth-and-goal in the second quarter. — Rob Demovsky

Next game: vs. Bears (8:20 p.m. ET, Sunday)

Chiefs

What to know: If the passing game is going to suffer without wideout Tyreek Hill, upcoming opponents are going to need to defend the Chiefs much better than the Cardinals did. Patrick Mahomes said Kansas City would spread the ball around, and he delivered, completing passes to nine different receivers and throwing his five TD passes to four different players.

Will the pass rush be more productive than last year, when the Chiefs were 29th in sacks? The Chiefs have reason to be encouraged after Sunday’s game against the Cardinals, even though their stats weren’t outstanding. They sacked Kyler Murray twice (they had three total) and pressured him 10 times in 36 dropbacks, according to NFL Next Gen Stats. But the Chiefs didn’t put much emphasis on pressuring Murray, either, blitzing him only 10 times. — Adam Teicher

Next game: vs. Chargers (8:15 p.m. ET, Thursday)


Cardinals

What to know: The Cardinals picked up where they left off last season — and that’s not a good thing. Arizona on Sunday lacked discipline, offensive ingenuity, solid tackling and consistent protection of quarterback Kyler Murray. For all the talk this offseason of getting over last year’s late meltdown and winning at home, none of it came to fruition in a blowout loss to the Chiefs.

What do the Cardinals fix first? Figuring out where to start feels like a monumental task, as the issues that plagued the Cardinals against the Chiefs aren’t new. The fact they’ve carried over from last season is a huge concern. The first thing Arizona needs to address is the lack of offensive production. Not enough plays were run for A.J. Green, Marquise Brown and Zach Ertz early on, causing the offense to look stuck, which led to Arizona scoring just seven points in the first three quarters. — Josh Weinfuss

Next game: at Raiders (4:25 p.m. ET, Sunday)

Dolphins

What to know: This is Tyreek Hill‘s offense. Just in case it wasn’t obvious before, the Dolphins made it clear things will run through Hill, as he made his regular-season debut after being traded to Miami from the Kansas City Chiefs. He was targeted five times in his first eight routes, finishing with 94 yards and eight catches on 12 targets.

How concerning was Miami’s performance on the ground Sunday? One of the NFL’s worst rushing teams a season ago, the Dolphins had 65 yards on 21 carries against the Patriots — who were the league’s 22nd-best run defense in 2021. Miami also struggled to run the ball during training camp and the preseason. The difference Sunday for Miami compared to last season is there is now a competent passing game to carry the offense when things aren’t working on the ground. As teams come to respect that passing game, the run game should open up; it’s not quite time to panic yet. — Marcel Louis-Jacques

Next game: at Ravens (1 p.m. ET, Sunday)


Patriots

What to know: Self-inflicted wounds cost the Patriots in a game that was winnable. They were minus-3 in the turnover differential, and they didn’t convert on fourth-and-3, which essentially is another turnover. When one of those turnovers is a strip sack that results in a touchdown, and the other comes in the end zone on a 50-50 ball (in which officials easily could have called defensive pass interference), it hurts that much more. It is often said that before a team can learn how to win, it has to learn how not to lose. That holds true for the Patriots after one game.

Can the offense improve fast enough to give the team a chance? The Patriots’ offense moved the ball — which was a promising development based on how the preseason went — but couldn’t close things out consistently enough. It was notable that Kendrick Bourne, who was the team’s second-leading receiver last year with 55 receptions for 800 yards and five touchdowns, didn’t play until deep into the fourth quarter. He promptly caught a 41-yard pass down the left sideline. For an offense that is in need of explosiveness, why isn’t Bourne playing more? — Mike Reiss

Next game: at Steelers (1 p.m. ET, Sunday)

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Nelson Agholor fumbles after catching a pass from Mac Jones to give the Dolphins back the ball in the fourth quarter.

Ravens

What to know: Lamar Jackson isn’t distracted by the lack of a contract extension. Jackson dominated like he usually does in a season opener, throwing for three touchdowns with one interception. He played loose, looking off his favorite target, Mark Andrews, over the middle and finding Devin Duvernay 25 yards downfield in the end zone. Jackson then stepped up for a 55-yard touchdown strike to Rashod Bateman (his first on a pass that traveled at least 50 yards in the air). It was the type of performance that the Ravens desperately needed for an offense that is without its top two left tackles (Ronnie Stanley and Ja’Wuan James) and top running back (J.K. Dobbins).

Can the Ravens maintain this relentless pressure on quarterbacks all season? After hearing all offseason how their pass rush was the biggest question (Baltimore ranked 22nd in sacks last season), the Ravens recorded three sacks (another was negated by a penalty) and nine quarterback hits in their reunion with Super Bowl-winning quarterback Joe Flacco. Justin Houston continually crashed the edge, and Justin Madubuike collapsed the pocket from the middle. The Ravens, though, wreaked havoc against a Jets offensive line dealing with injuries. Baltimore still has something to prove in Week 2 against Miami quarterback Tua Tagovailoa, who was sacked three times against the Patriots in the opener. — Jamison Hensley

Next game: vs. Dolphins (1 p.m. ET, Sunday)


Jets

What to know: The seasons change, but the results remain the same: The New York Jets stink in September. They tied an NFL record with their 13th straight defeat in the opening month with a mistake-filled, 24-9 loss to the Ravens at home. The Joe Flacco-led offense fell flat, converting only 2 of 14 third downs. The Jets upgraded their skill positions in the offseason, but you couldn’t tell. There were too many dropped passes, a couple of key fumbles and leaky pass protection from the reshuffled offensive line. The defense did some nice things in the first half, but the revamped secondary eventually succumbed to Lamar Jackson, allowing three touchdown passes. The Jets were thoroughly outplayed in the second half, which doesn’t reflect well on coach Robert Saleh and his staff. It was a tough assignment, facing the Ravens with a backup quarterback, but the Jets were out of the game by the start of the fourth quarter.

Can Flacco keep the season alive until Zach Wilson returns? That’s a big ask, considering the upcoming opponents — the Cleveland Browns and Cincinnati Bengals, both good defensive teams. Wilson, recovering from knee surgery, is expected to miss at least two more games. The Jets could be 0-3 by then unless they show dramatic improvement. “Joe Cool” was Joe Cold against the team that drafted him, but he got no help from his supporting cast. The fans will scream for Mike White to replace Flacco, but it’s too soon for that. The Jets don’t have a Flacco problem; they have an everything problem. — Rich Cimini

Next game: vs. Browns (1 p.m. ET, Sunday)

Browns

What to know: The Browns drafted Cade York in the fourth round for days like Sunday. With eight seconds left, the rookie out of LSU drilled a 58-yard field goal, lifting the Browns to the dramatic victory. Cleveland will have plenty of issues to address coming out of this game. But after years of struggling on special teams, the Browns finally have a kicker with the confidence to deliver big-time field goals.

Can Cleveland get more from the passing game? Cleveland’s powerful running game — behind RBs Nick Chubb, Kareem Hunt and an imposing offensive line — controlled the game. But the Browns could’ve put Carolina away much earlier had QB Jacoby Brissett capitalized by connecting with open receivers in the first half. Brissett converted on some clutch third-down throws in the fourth quarter. But Cleveland will need more out of its passing attack to stick in the AFC playoff picture. — Jake Trotter

Next game: vs. Jets (1 p.m. ET, Sunday)


Panthers

What to know: The Panthers still don’t know whether Baker Mayfield can be a long-term solution at quarterback, but they know they have a QB capable of bringing them back in the fourth quarter — something they haven’t had the past few years. While Mayfield was superior to Sam Darnold in training camp, he was horrible against his former team for most of three quarters before bringing the Panthers within striking distance with some fourth-quarter heroics, including a 7-yard scramble for a touchdown and a 75-yard touchdown pass to Robbie Anderson. He then led them to a go-ahead field goal, only to see his efforts thwarted by Cleveland’s 58-yard field goal at the end.

Where was running back Christian McCaffrey in the game plan? The talk all offseason was that Mayfield and the Carolina offense can succeed only if McCaffrey stays healthy. The plan was to monitor McCaffrey’s snaps to promote his long-term health. But McCaffrey had only nine touches until Carolina’s final drive, and 14 for the game. He did come through with a big play on a screen pass (plus a personal foul penalty against the Browns) to set up a go-ahead field goal, but Carolina needs more than 57 yards from their star to win consistently. — David Newton

Next game: at Giants (1 p.m. ET, Sunday)

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Baker Mayfield launches a 75-yard TD to Robbie Anderson to put the Panthers within two.

Commanders

What to know: Carson Wentz is a definite upgrade at quarterback, and at times he showed why on Sunday. But he also showed why he has been maddening throughout his career. He threw two touchdown passes in the first half, executing well-designed play calls with pinpoint throws. Washington was rolling. But on consecutive plays in the second half, he threw interceptions, leading to 10 Jacksonville points. He missed some easy throws, sailing passes. While there were questions in the past about how Wentz handled adversity, this is what he did after two miscues Sunday: He threw two more touchdown passes. Give him credit for responding.

Where is the defensive improvement? Washington held Jacksonville to 22 points, but the Jaguars missed some easy opportunities when quarterback Trevor Lawrence overthrew open targets for potential touchdowns. It allowed 383 total yards, but at least the Commanders intercepted a pass to end Jacksonville’s hopes. Washington did better on third downs — the Jags converted 3 of 12 opportunities — but if the Commanders want to take a step forward, the defense must play better. The Jaguars averaged 6.8 yards per run, the Washington pass rush was inconsistent, and cornerback William Jackson III needs to be better in coverage. — John Keim

Next game: at Lions (1 p.m. ET, Sunday)


Jaguars

What to know: The Jaguars were last in the NFL in turnover margin (minus-20) in 2021 but were able to work their way back into this game because they forced three turnovers (two interceptions and a fumble recovery) and didn’t give the ball away. The two interceptions in the second half set up 10 points. Forcing turnovers — the Jaguars did that only nine times last season — was a major push during the offseason, and two of the turnovers were by newcomers: Foyesade Oluokun and Travon Walker. The Jaguars are still trying to find their way offensively, but nothing helps a struggling offense more than a ball-hawking defense. If the defense can continue to do that, the Jaguars will continue to be competitive.

Can Trevor Lawrence help himself and give up on a play? Lawrence was twice flagged for intentional grounding, and in each instance, he was fighting to make a play with someone either hanging on to him or in his face. Sometimes the smart play is to eat the ball and take the sack — especially since those kinds of throws are usually off target and pretty risky. — Mike DiRocco

Next game: vs. Colts (1 p.m. ET, Sunday)

Eagles

What to know: A.J. Brown is in line for a huge year. He erupted for 10 catches for 155 yards against the Lions, setting a record for most receiving yards in an Eagles debut. Quarterback Jalen Hurts targeted Brown 13 times — nine more than the next-closest receiving option. Hurts and Brown consider each other best friends, and they got together “countless times” during the offseason to work on their connection. It’s fair to say that effort paid off.

What’s up with the defense? The Lions look to be an improved team, but the Eagles had no business yielding 35 points. Rush defense in particular was a problem, with the Lions rolling up 181 yards on 28 carries (6.5 average). The Eagles played their starters only briefly during the preseason and didn’t go live much at training camp. Perhaps that’s why the defense looked out of sync. Philadelphia better hope so. — Tim McManus

Next game: vs. Vikings (8:30 p.m. ET, Monday)


Lions

What to know: Philadelphia-born D’Andre Swift was one of the bright spots for Detroit, rushing for 97 of his career-best 144 yards in the opening half against the Eagles. He became the first player since Barry Sanders in 1996 with 100 rushing yards in a season opener.

Should Lions fans be concerned with the 0-1 start? Not too much. The Eagles made the playoffs last season and nobody is expecting this Lions team to be a postseason contender in 2022. It would be easy to get down after yet another season-opening loss. However, despite glaring defensive issues, Detroit did fight back and make it a game late. — Eric Woodyard

Next game: vs. Commanders (1 p.m. ET, Sunday)

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Eric Moody explains what A.J. Brown’s early fantasy success means for managers going forward.

Saints

What to know: Michael Thomas is back. The Saints looked like they were in big trouble in the first half with their offense unable to do much of anything, but the wide receiver proved he still has a lot left in the tank despite not playing a game last season. Thomas’ two touchdowns in the second half were a major reason the Saints were able to come back despite trailing by 16 points at one point in the second half. Thomas will clearly be a key part of the Saints’ offense turning things around from last year.

Do the Saints have issues in the trenches? Neither the Saints’ offensive line nor their defensive line will enjoy watching this game film. The O-line’s issues protecting quarterback Jameis Winston were one reason the offense struggled so much in the first half. While Winston’s four sacks weren’t entirely on the line, it certainly contributed. On the other side, the Saints’ D-line was not able to sack Marcus Mariota once. — Katherine Terrell

Next game: vs. Buccaneers (1 p.m. ET, Sunday)


Falcons

What to know: Did that really just happen? What looked like a big debut for quarterback Marcus Mariota in Atlanta and an unexpected win turned into, what else, a double-digit, fourth-quarter collapse. A 16-point lead turned into a loss. How? A reader’s digest: The defense went from aggressive to porous. The offense offered two of its least productive drives of the afternoon. And now the Falcons, who had a chance to head to Los Angeles with a huge boost in Week 2, have to lament a real opportunity slipping away.

Yes, that pressure is improved from last season, but is it sustainable? That’s going to be an unknown for at least a little while, but defensive coordinator Dean Pees was willing to send rushers from every level of the defense, which helped create problems, including four sacks and eight quarterback hits. New Orleans came back when the Falcons stopped creating pressure (not the best decision considering the fourth-quarter meltdown), but considering the Falcons next face the Rams, who allowed seven sacks and 15 quarterback hits on Thursday, there could be more opportunities coming. — Michael Rothstein

Next game: at Rams (4:05 p.m. ET, Sunday)

Bears

What to know: The Bears showed they’re capable of fighting back despite a sloppy and ineffective start. In the first half, quarterback Justin Fields went 3-for-9 for 19 yards and an interception. Chicago’s pass protection was a mess, and the Bears got past their own 35-yard line only once. It was a totally different story in the second half. Fields had a window to get the Bears back in this game by utilizing his incredible playmaking ability to extend a play for Chicago’s first score of the game. Fields ended up going 5-for-8 for 102 yards and two touchdown passes in the second half, and the Bears’ offense scored touchdowns on three straight possessions to solidify their first win of the season.

How can the Bears get their skill position players involved sooner? The Bears tried to commit to the run in the first half (19 rushing attempts), and it made sense because of the miserable weather and soggy field conditions, but it took too long for Chicago to open things up against a 49ers secondary that got stuck in cement. Fields didn’t connect with a wide receiver until he turned a broken play on third-and-long into a 51-yard touchdown pass to Dante Pettis in the third quarter. He then found wideout Equanimeous St. Brown for an 18-yard touchdown that gave the Bears the lead, and Chicago put the Niners away by capitalizing off a turnover to punch in a 3-yard touchdown run by Khalil Herbert. This offense is a work in progress, but it has to get its best players involved and support Fields far sooner in Week 2 at Green Bay. — Courtney Cronin

Next game: at Packers (8:20 p.m. ET, Sunday)


49ers

What to know: If the 49ers are going to be the contender they believe they can be, they can’t afford the type of silly mistakes that cost them Sunday’s game against the Bears. On a wet, sloppy field, points always figured to be at a premium, but the Niners piled up a variety of self-inflicted errors that not only kept Chicago in the game but put it in position to win. The Niners finished with 12 penalties for 99 yards. On Chicago’s first two scoring drives, the Niners were flagged for two 15-yard penalties, dropped an interception and picked up a holding penalty on a third down to keep the chains moving. Moments later, quarterback Trey Lance threw an interception. Quite simply, the Niners aren’t built to overcome so many costly errors, especially with Lance learning on the go.

How much does this loss hurt the 49ers? The Niners were hoping to start faster after they spent the second half of last year desperately trying to get back in the playoff mix. Sure, weird stuff happens in Week 1 all the time and it’s a long season, but this is the kind of loss that could be particularly haunting for San Francisco. The schedule is only going to get more difficult as the season goes along, which means the Niners had better get the ship righted soon or they’re going to be playing do-or-die games throughout the final half of the year just like they did in 2021. — Nick Wagoner

Next game: vs. Seahawks (4:05 p.m. ET, Sunday)

Colts

What to know: The Colts now haven’t won a season opener in nine years. The Colts have found all manner of ways to lose in Week 1 going back to 2014. While they managed a tie Sunday, this game was similar in that the outcome was the product of a long list of miscues ranging from dropped passes to untimely penalties to, most of all, the missed 42-yard field goal attempt by kicker Rodrigo Blankenship in overtime that would have won it. The Colts rallied from a 20-3 late-third-quarter deficit only to come away with nothing to show for it.

Where do the Colts go at kicker? The Colts were not confident in their place-kicking situation to begin with, which is why the team added Jake Verity for preseason competition. Verity performed poorly in training camp and the preseason, giving Blankenship the win in the position battle by default. But he remains a liability for the team, as he has been unreliable in pressure situations for Indianapolis. Blankenship’s leg strength has also been an issue. He’s 1-for-4 beyond 50 yards in his two previous seasons. The Colts have to avoid getting into a situation like they did in 2019, when veteran Adam Vinatieri’s late-career struggles cost the team multiple potential wins. — Stephen Holder

Next game: at Jaguars (1 p.m. ET, Sunday)


Texans

What to know: The Texans missed a golden opportunity to beat the division favorite Indianapolis Colts, blowing a 17-point lead in the fourth quarter. It’s the first tie in Texans history. The Colts had 216 yards and 17 points in the fourth quarter after being held to three points and 232 yards in the first three. The Texans’ defense allowed Colts quarterback Matt Ryan to go 12-for-19 for 146 yards and a touchdown, and running back Jonathan Taylor gashed the defense for 70 yards and a touchdown on nine carries. Then in overtime the same theme continued, as the Texans’ defense allowed the Colts to march into field goal range before Colts kicker Rodrigo Blankenship missed a 42-yarder.

Are the first and fourth quarters an indication of what the offense will be? Quarterback Davis Mills completed zero passes in the fourth quarter, as the offense completely disappeared with 12 yards and zero points. That helped the Colts to come back and force overtime. In the first quarter, the Texans produced only 13 yards as Mills completed two passes for 6 yards. The running game was also nonexistent throughout the game, finishing with 77 yards (their average of 83 from 2021 was dead last in the NFL). — DJ Bien-Aime

Next game: at Broncos (4:25 p.m. ET, Sunday)

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Jonathan Taylor won’t be denied as he crosses the goal line to pull the Colts closer.

Steelers

What to know: When the dust finally settled on the Steelers’ wild overtime win, one thing was clear: This defense is better than advertised, but more impactful than the outcome of the game was T.J. Watt leaving the field with less than 15 seconds left with an injury. He went straight to the locker room and appears to have a torn pectoral, per ESPN’s Adam Schefter. QB Joe Burrow committed four turnovers in the first half and another in the second. Minkah Fitzpatrick, who blocked a late Bengals extra point attempt to send the game to overtime, scored the first touchdown of the year when he intercepted Burrow’s first pass attempt and returned it 31 yards for a pick-six. The Steelers managed two more interceptions and a fumble recovery in the first half, but the offense scored only 10 points off those turnovers. The defense also sacked Burrow six times. For the Steelers to have success this season, they’ll need more offensive support — whether it’s putting points on the board or extending drives to give the defense a break.

Is this truly Mitch Trubisky‘s team? This will be the biggest question throughout the season — especially if Trubisky’s performance contributes to the offensive stagnation. The Steelers managed only 231 yards of total offense. Trubisky completed 21 of 38 attempts for 194 yards and a touchdown, but many of his passes missed the mark, including a handful that sailed too high. On a crucial third down in the fourth quarter, Trubisky’s pass bounced between two receivers, and the Steelers came away from another forced turnover without any points. A lowlight of the preseason, the Steelers’ offensive line held up pretty well, and Trubisky was sacked only once and hit four times. But the offense couldn’t maintain possession and the Bengals held a 43:43-26:17 edge in time of possession. — Brooke Pryor

Next game: vs. Patriots (1 p.m. ET, Sunday)


Bengals

What to know: Cincinnati’s offense picked up right where it left off last season. And that was the main culprit in an overtime loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers in the season opener. It featured a slew of sacks and an inconsistent offense. Those things kept the Bengals from winning Super Bowl LVI despite a very strong defensive effort, which the Bengals got again on Sunday. Cincinnati needs to get that issue resolved if it wants to defend its AFC championship.

Should the Bengals be concerned about Joe Burrow? Uh, no. Sure, Burrow objectively played his worst game since entering the league. He committed five turnovers — four interceptions and a lost fumble on a day when he was sacked six times. But Burrow’s history, strengths and the resolve he showed to lead the Bengals down the field at the end of the game show that there should be zero long-term concerns for the third-year player coming off an emergency appendectomy in July. — Ben Baby

Next game: at Cowboys (4:25 p.m. ET, Sunday)

Thursday

Bills

What to know: The Bills played far from a perfect game and still walked away from the season opener against the defending Super Bowl champions with a 21-point victory. After three first-half turnovers, the offense responded in spectacular fashion with three straight touchdown drives and finished the game converting 9 of 10 third downs, becoming the fourth team in the past 50 seasons to convert 90% of its third downs in a game. In addition to the offensive success, the defensive line lived up to the high expectations, finishing with seven sacks on Matthew Stafford, including two from Von Miller against his former team.

Will the Bills continue to use quarterback Josh Allen as a rusher at this high of a level throughout the season? Once again, Allen finished a Bills game as the team’s leading rusher with 10 carries for 56 yards and a touchdown. While his stiff-arm near the sideline was impressive and caught attention, the amount of hits the quarterback is taking through the course of the season is something that the team has talked about trying to minimize, especially early in the year. “Limiting the hits, obviously slide and getting outta bounds — it’s the utmost importance there,” Allen said. “The best ability is availability, but again, when I’m called upon to do something for my team, I’m willing to do it.” Should Allen be rushing with a two-touchdown lead even if he is effective? Offensive coordinator Ken Dorsey will have to continue to work on the right balance throughout the season. — Alaina Getzenberg

Next game: vs. Titans (7:15 p.m. ET, Monday)


Rams

What to know: It’s been only one game, but Rams quarterback Matthew Stafford didn’t do much to end the questions about his elbow injury and whether it is affecting his game. Stafford was sacked seven times by the Bills and threw three interceptions. He also struggled when targeting any player but wide receiver Cooper Kupp, who accounted for more than half of the Rams’ receiving yardage.

Do the Rams expect to see more from two key players, RB Cam Akers and WR Allen Robinson II, going forward? When Rams coach Sean McVay was asked about Akers’ involvement in the game, he said, “We really just didn’t get in much of a rhythm tonight.” Akers played 12 snaps on Thursday to Darrell Henderson Jr. ‘s 54. In McVay’s answer, he also brought up that he wanted to get Robinson more involved in the offense. Robinson was targeted just twice on 45 routes run, according to NFL Next Gen Stats. The 4.4% target rate was the lowest of his career. — Sarah Barshop

Next game: vs. Falcons (4:05 p.m. ET, Sunday)

#Week #takeaways #big #questions #Bucs #stifle #Cowboys #bad #losses #Bengals #Patriots #Titans #49ers

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